Prefaces to Sidney Loney's books

We give below versions of Prefaces to some of Sidney Loney's books:


1. S L Loney, The Elements of Statics and Dynamics, Part I Statics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1890).
Preface.

In the following work I have aimed at writing a working text-book on Statics for the use of Junior Students.

Throughout the book will be found a large number of examples ; most of them, with the exception of many of those at the end of the Chapter on Friction and the Miscellaneous Examples at the end of the volume, are of an easy type.

I have tried to make the book complete as far as it goes; it is suggested, however, that the student should, on the first reading of the subject, omit everything marked with an asterisk.

I must express my obligations to my friend Mr H C Robson, M.A., Fellow and Lecturer of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, for his kindness in reading through the proof-sheets, and for many suggestions that he has made to me.

Any corrections of errors, or hints for improvement will be thankfully received.

S L LONEY.
Barnes, S.W.
December, 1890.

2. S L Loney, The Elements of Statics and Dynamics, Part I Statics (Tenth Edition) (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1890).
Preface to the Tenth Edition.

The book has been somewhat altered, and I hope improved, for this edition, and the type entirely re-set. Graphic solutions have been introduced much earlier, and more use has been made of graphic methods throughout the book.

More experimental work has also been introduced.

The chapter on Work has been placed earlier, and much greater stress has been laid upon the Principle of Work. Sundry somewhat long analytical proofs have been relegated to the last chapter, and here I have not scrupled to introduce alternative proofs involving the use of the Differential Calculus.

For ten of the new figures in this book I am much indebted to the kindness and courtesy of Dr R T Glazebrook, who allowed me to use the blocks prepared for his Statics. Most of these figures have the additional merit of having been drawn from actual apparatus in use at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge.

S L LONEY.
Royal Holloway College
Engefield Green, Surrey.
July 23rd, 1906.

3. S L Loney, The Elements of Statics and Dynamics. Part II Dynamics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1891).
Preface.

The present book forms Part II of The Elements of Statics and Dynamics, of which Part I. (Statics) has already been published.

It aims at being useful for Schools and the less advanced students of Colleges; the examples are, in consequence, large in number, and generally of a numerical and easy character. Except in two articles and a few examples at the end of the Chapter on Projectiles, it is only presumed that the student has a knowledge of Elementary Geometry and Algebra, and of the Elements of Trigonometry.

It is suggested that, on a first reading of the subjects, all articles marked with an asterisk should be omitted.

Part I. and Part ll. are, as far as is possible, independent of one another; hence, any teacher, who wishes his pupils to commence with Dynamics, may take Part II. before Part I., by omitting an occasional article which refers to Statics.

Any corrections of mistakes, or hints for improvement will be gratefully received.

S L LONEY.
Barnes, S.W.
March, 1891.

4. S L Loney, Plane trigonometry (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1893).
Preface.

The following work will, I hope, be found to be a fairly complete elementary text-book on Plane Trigonometry, suitable for Schools and the Pass and Junior Honour classes of Universities. In the higher portion of the book I have endeavoured to present to the student, as simply as possible, the modern treatment of complex quantities, and I hope it will be found that he will have little to unlearn when he commences to read treatises of a more difficult character.

As Trigonometry consists largely of formulae and the applications thereof, I have prefixed (on pages x to xvi) a list of the principal formulas which the student should commit to memory. These more important formulae are distinguished in the text by the use of thick type. Other formulae are subsidiary and of less importance.

The number of examples is very large. A selection only should be solved by the student on a first reading.

On a first reading also the articles marked with an asterisk should be omitted.

Considerable attention has been paid to the printing of the book and I am under great obligation to the Syndics of the Press for their liberality in this matter, and to the officers and workmen of the Press for the trouble they have taken.

I am indebted to Mr W J Dobbs, B.A., late Scholar of St John's College, for his kindness in reading and correcting the proof-sheets and for many valuable suggestions.

For any corrections and suggestions for improvement I shall be thankful.

S L LONEY.
Royal Holloway College,
Egham, Surrey.
September 12, 1893.

5. S L Loney, The Elements of Coordinate Geometry (MacMillan and Co, London, 1895).
Preface.

In the following work I have tried to present the elements of Coordinate Geometry in a manner suitable for Beginners and Junior Students. The present book only deals with Cartesian and Polar Coordinates. Within these limits I venture to hope that the book is fairly complete, and that no propositions of very great importance have been omitted.

The Straight Line and Circle have been treated more fully than the other portions of the subject, since it is generally in the elementary conceptions that beginners find great difficulties.

There are a large number of Examples, over 1100 in all, and they are, in general, of an elementary character. The examples are especially numerous in the earlier parts of the book.

I am much indebted to several friends for reading portions of the proof sheets, but especially to Mr W. J. Dobbs, M.A. who has kindly read the whole of the book and made many valuable suggestions.

For any criticisms, suggestions, or corrections, I shall be grateful.

S L LONEY.
Royal Holloway College for Women,
Egham, Surrey.
July 4, 1895.

6. S L Loney, Shilling Arithmetic (Macmillan and Co., London, 1906).
Preface.

This little book has been prepared in the hope of meeting the requirements of Secondary Schools, and covers the course for the Oxford and Cambridge Junior Local Examinations. The scheme recommended by the Mathematical Association has been generally followed, though it was not found advisable, or even possible, to omit entirely the subject of Recurring Decimals.

The book is written on the lines of Loney's "Arithmetic for Schools," and both its text and examples have been used when they seemed best adapted to the present purpose. Many changes and simplifications have, however, been made which a considerable experience in School Teaching has suggested.

In order to deal as fully as possible with the less elementary processes of Arithmetic, and at the same time to keep the book within a reasonable size, it is assumed that the student already knows the four "Simple" Rules and the "Compound" Rules. Twelve pages of miscellaneous questions on these are given, and it is hoped that they will be found sufficient for revision. The ordinary Tables are prefixed.

S L LONEY.
December 4th, 1805.

7. S L Loney, The Elements of Hydrostatics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1912).
Preface.

The present volume is intended to be for the use of the class of students for whom my Elements of Statics and Dynamics was written, and may be regarded as a continuation of that book.

Hence, except in a very few articles, only a knowledge of Elementary Geometry and Algebra and of the Elements of Trigonometry is presumed.

A few formulae relating to the mensuration of some elementary solids are prefixed to the text.

Most of the examples in the chapters are easy, with the exception of a few in Chap. IV. and some at the end of Chap. V. These latter examples, as well as a few other examples and articles marked with asterisks, should be omitted by the student on a first reading of the subject.

The Miscellaneous Examples at the end of the book are, with the exception of the first few, generally of a harder type than those in the different chapters.

Any corrections of errors, or hints for improvement of the book, will be thankfully received.

S L LONEY.
Royal Holloway College,
Egham, Surrey.
July 19, 1900.

8. S L Loney, An Elementary Treatise on Statics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1912)
Preface.

The present work is a companion book to my Dynamics of a Particle and of Rigid Bodies. It is meant to cover the usual course of Statics for Students who are reading for a Degree in Science or Engineering, and for Junior Students for Mathematical Honours.

The book starts with the elementary Principles of the subject, but a Student would profit more by its use if he had previously read some elementary work, such as my Elements of Statics. A knowledge of the ordinary processes of the Differential and Integral Calculus is assumed, and also, in some articles, of the notions of Solid Geometry.

It will be evident that, in a book of this size, many parts of the subject must be quite untouched, but I have some hopes that, within the limits I have set to myself, the book is fairly complete.

The number or examples is large, and is intended to be useful for Students of very varying capacity. I have verified most of the questions, and hope that the number of important errors will be found to be small.

For any corrections, or suggestions for improvement, I shall be grateful

S L LONEY.
25 December 1912.

9. S L Loney, An Elementary Treatise on the Dynamics of a Particle and of Rigid Bodies (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1926).
Preface.

In the following work I have tried to write an elementary class-book on those parts of Dynamics of a Particle and Rigid Dynamics which are usually read by Students attending a course of lectures in Applied Mathematics for a Science or Engineering Degree, and by Junior Students for Mathematical Honours. Within the limits with which it professes to deal, I hope it will be found to be fairly complete. I assume that the Student has previously read some such course as is included in my Elementary Dynamics. I also assume that he possesses a fair working knowledge of Differential and Integral Calculus; the Differential Equations, with which he will meet, are solved in the Text, and in an Appendix he will find a summary of the methods of solution of such equations.

In Rigid Dynamics I have chiefly confined myself to two-dimensional motion, and I have omitted all reference to moving axes.

I have included in the book a large number of Examples, mostly collected from University and College Examination Papers: I have verified every question, and hope that there will not be found a large number of serious errors.

Solutions of the Examples have now been published.

S L LONEY.
December, 1926.

10. S L Loney, Solutions of the Examples in a Treatise on Dynamics of a Particle and of Rigid Bodies (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1926).
Preface.

In the following solutions, for the sake of brevity, the symbols used have in many cases not been defined, when the notation used has been the same as that of the text, or where the meaning is clear.

S L LONEY.
March, 1926.


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