Search Results for harvard


Biographies

  1. Aiken biography
    • It was suggested to him that he would prefer the research topics that interested the Harvard professors.
    • After only part of a year at Chicago, Aiken transferred to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard in 1933.
    • Aiken was 33 years old when he began his graduate studies at Harvard.
    • in physics in June 1937 and obtained a doctorate from Harvard in February 1939 for his thesis Theory of space charge conduction.
    • He was appointed as a Faculty Instructor (the Harvard equivalent of Assistant Professor) in Physics and Communication Engineering at Harvard in September 1939.
    • While he was a graduate student and an instructor in the Department of Physics at Harvard, Aiken began to make plans to build a large computer.
    • The report was sufficient to prompt senior staff at Harvard to contact IBM and an agreement was made that Aiken would build his computer at the IBM laboratories at Endicott, helped by IBM engineers.
    • I got a call from a faculty member at Harvard I didn't know by the name of Howard Aiken.
    • He told me Harvard needed someone to continue the liaison with IBM.
    • Having completed construction of ASCC in 1943 it was decided to move the computer to Harvard University where it began to be used from May 1944.
    • Grace Hopper worked with Aiken from 1944 on the ASCC computer which had been renamed the Harvard Mark I and given by IBM to Harvard University.
    • The computer figured highly in the Bureau of Ordnance's Computation Project at Harvard University, to which Hopper had been assigned, being used by the US navy for gunnery and ballistics calculations.
    • Richard Bloch also worked with Aiken at Harvard on the ASCC.
    • Monty had studied at Radcliffe College of Harvard University.
    • Aiken completed the Harvard Mark II, a completely electronic computer, in 1947.
    • He continued to work at Harvard on this series of machines, working next on the Mark III and finally the Mark IV up to 1952.
    • In 1961 Aiken retired from Harvard and was appointed as Distinguished Professor of Information at the University of Miami at Fort Lauderdale.

  2. Hiebert biography
    • During the summers, he worked [',' Erwin N Hiebert, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University (2013).','5]:- .
    • Returning to the United States, he was appointed as an Instructor in the History of Science at Harvard University.
    • During this period at Wisconsin, Hiebert was an American Scholar in Kabul (in summer 1961 at the International Education Exchange Program), was a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey in 1961-62 and again in 1968-69, Visiting Professor at the University of Tubingen, Germany in 1964-65, and Visiting Professor at Harvard in 1965.
    • In 1970 Hiebert moved from Wisconsin to Harvard.
    • He had just received several telephone calls from John Murdoch at Harvard trying to persuade him to leave Wisconsin and join the Harvard department.
    • for Harvard," and above it was the caption, "Wife Gets Musicology Ph.D." .
    • Joan Richards was an undergraduate at Harvard when Hiebert arrived there in the autumn of 1970 [',' J L Richards, A Personal Appreciation.
    • The Harvard Years, in Mary Jo Nye, Joan L Richards and Roger H Stuewer (eds.), The Invention of Physical Science (Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht-Boston-London, 1992), xix-xxiv.','11]:- .
    • He came to the Harvard History of Science Department when I was a senior there, but I neither took any courses with him nor even met him that year.
    • students that Hiebert advised while at Harvard [',' J L Richards, A Personal Appreciation.
    • The Harvard Years, in Mary Jo Nye, Joan L Richards and Roger H Stuewer (eds.), The Invention of Physical Science (Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht-Boston-London, 1992), xix-xxiv.','11]:- .
    • Hiebert was Chairman of the Department of History of Science at Harvard University from 1977 to 1984.
    • During his years at Harvard, Hiebert made many visits abroad as a Visiting Lecturer or Visiting Scholar.
    • In 1989 he reached the age of seventy and he retired from Harvard, being made Professor Emeritus.
    • He continued to make visits abroad as a Visiting Professor after retiring from Harvard, for example Gottingen in 1991-92 and Berlin in 1998, 2002, and 2007.
    • The Harvard University obituary for Hiebert [',' A H Compton, Review: The Impact of Atomic Energy, by Erwin Hiebert, Science, New Series 134 (3486) (1961), 1231-1233.','3] states:- .
    • A memorial service for Hiebert was held at Memorial Church in Harvard Yard on 17 February 2013.

  3. McMullen biography
    • He said that during his undergraduate years at Williams College [',' A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).','6]:- .
    • He then returned to the United States to begin research in 1981 at Harvard University.
    • He explains in [',' A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).','6] how he managed to obtain a Ph.D.
    • from Harvard with Dennis Sullivan as his thesis advisor, although Sullivan did not work at Harvard:- .
    • At Yorktown Heights [',' A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).','6]:- .
    • He submitted his thesis Families of Rational Maps and Iterative Root-Finding Algorithms to Harvard University and was awarded his doctorate in June 1985.
    • McMullen explains that [',' A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).','6]:- .
    • He left Berkeley in 1998 when appointed to a professorship at Harvard University.
    • In 2001 he was named Maria Moors Cabot Professor at Harvard, a position he continues to hold.
    • In [',' A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).','6] he tells a nice story about the Fields Medal:- .

  4. Mackey biography
    • Mackey, 90 : Obituary, Harvard News (Cambridge, March 2006.','1] and [',' B Marquard, George Mackey, professor devoted to truth, theorems, Boston Globe (Boston, 28 April 2006).','2]):- .
    • After the award of a bachelor's degree from the Rice Institute in 1938 (Rice Institute was founded in 1891 and only became Rice University in 1960), Mackey went to Harvard to undertake postgraduate work.
    • He was one of the first to be awarded a William Lowell Putnam fellowships to undertake research at Harvard.
    • He was awarded a Master's Degree in mathematics from Harvard in 1939, then continued undertaking research there for his doctorate under Marshall Stone's supervision.
    • Although he majored in physics for his bachelor's degree, he moved towards mathematics at Harvard.
    • Mackey, 90 : Obituary, Harvard News (Cambridge, March 2006.','1] or [',' B Marquard, George Mackey, professor devoted to truth, theorems, Boston Globe (Boston, 28 April 2006).','2]):- .
    • from Harvard, Mackey spent a year teaching at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.
    • In 1943 he was appointed as an instructor in mathematics at Harvard University and he was to remain on the faculty there for the rest of his career.
    • He was promoted to assistant professor at Harvard in 1946, to associate professor in 1948, and to full professor in 1956.
    • Then, in 1969, he was honoured by being named Landon T Clay Professor of Mathematics at Harvard.
    • In the spring of 1960 he gave a lecture course at Harvard University on the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics.
    • In 1967 Mackey published Lectures on the theory of functions of a complex variable which was based on an undergraduate course he gave at Harvard during the academic year 1959-60.
    • Clifford Taubes, chairman of Harvard University's mathematics department gave this appreciation of Mackey:- .
    • Many doctoral students at Harvard having Mackey as a thesis advisor went on to have academic careers.
    • Mackey, 90 : Obituary, Harvard News (Cambridge, March 2006.','1] say much about George Mackey.
    • Harvard University .

  5. Quine biography
    • He graduated from Oberlin College in 1930 and then won a scholarship to study for his doctorate at Harvard University.
    • He married Naomi Clayton, who he had known at Oberlin College, soon after arriving in Harvard.
    • It was Whitehead who introduced him to Russell, who was visiting Harvard to lecture there, and from that time Quine began a correspondence with Russell.
    • in philosophy from Harvard in 1932, Quine described the following year, perhaps the most important for his future research, in a somewhat matter of fact way:- .
    • Then I came back to Harvard as a Junior Fellow in 1933.
    • After Quine returned to Harvard in 1933 to take up the Junior Fellowship he published his first book A System of Logistics which was the published version of his doctoral thesis.
    • Quine was appointed onto the staff at Harvard in 1936 as an Instructor in Philosophy.
    • Harvard was good about letting me teach my own interests.
    • The year 1940 was an exciting one for Quine at Harvard for in that year both Carnap and Tarski visited Harvard and the three debated logical positivism.
    • He returned to Harvard where he was promoted to Professor in 1948.
    • Quine became Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy at Harvard in 1956, a post he retained until he retired in 1978.
    • He continued as Edgar Pierce Professor Emeritus at Harvard, commuting daily to his corner office in Emerson Hall, for many years after he retired.
    • The University of Lille, Oxford University, Cambridge University, Uppsala University, the University of Bern, and Harvard University were among the eighteen universities awarding him an honorary degree.

  6. Peirce B O biography
    • He was successful in the entrance examinations to Harvard College, entering in the autumn of 1872.
    • He graduated from Harvard College with a degree in his main subject of physics in 1876.
    • Trowbridge had brought a major change to the department at Harvard following his appointment in 1870.
    • He said [',' Early history of the Department, Department of Physics, Harvard University.','7]:- .
    • In the same year he also published the single authored paper On the induction spark produced in breaking a galvanic circuit between the poles of a magnet [',' Early history of the Department, Department of Physics, Harvard University.','7]:- .
    • In the following year he was appointed as an Instructor in Mathematics at Harvard where he built up the teaching of mathematical physics.
    • In 1884 Peirce was promoted to Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Physics, working under Joseph Lovering (1813-1892) who was Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Harvard, a post he had been appointed to in 1838.
    • Peirce was assisted in developing the teaching of mathematical physics at Harvard by his colleague William Elwood Byerly (1849-1935).
    • Byerly had been appointed as an assistant professor of mathematics at Harvard in 1876 and promoted to full professor in 1881.
    • Arthur Gordon Webster, who was a student at Harvard at this time, writes [',' A G Webster, Benjamin Osgood Peirce, Science, New Series 39 (999) (1914), 274-277.','12]:- .
    • In 1910 he was awarded an honorary degree by Harvard University.
    • In 1912 he represented Harvard University at the celebrations for the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Society of London.
    • He returned to Harvard during the summer of 1913 and began teaching again at the start of the autumn term.

  7. Lewis biography
    • He applied to enter Harvard and they listened to the reports that his teachers wrote rather than his grades and accepted him.
    • In 1902 Lewis graduated from Haverhill High School and entered Harvard.
    • He had to find some way to pay his fees, however, so he worked in resort hotels during the summers and during term he earned money as a waiter in the Randall dining Hall at Harvard.
    • He disliked this intensely but it did allow him to return to Harvard and graduate in 1906 with an A.B.
    • Lewis returned to Harvard in autumn 1908 to study for his Ph.D.
    • by Harvard in 1910 for his thesis The place of intuition in knowledge.
    • In 1920 Lewis returned to Harvard when he was appointed as a Lecturer.
    • When Ralph Perry retired from the Edgar Pierce Chair in Philosophy at Harvard in 1946, Lewis was named Edgar Pierce Professor.
    • During these years at Harvard he published a number of important books such as: Mind and the World-Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (1929), in which he presented his ideas which grew out of his investigations in the field of exact logic and its application to mathematics; (with Cooper Harold Langford) Symbolic Logic (1932), which develops a modal system of "strict implication" for interpreting the logical force of "if .
    • from Harvard in 1932 with a thesis supervised by Alfred North Whitehead, attended lectures by Lewis.
    • Many a graduate student who came to Harvard's philosophy department because of the repute of the University, the department, or some more famous professor, found the most lasting impression was that made by Lewis.
    • After retiring from Harvard, Lewis spent one year lecturing at Princeton and then went to live in Menlo Park, California.

  8. Diaconis biography
    • Harvard was one such place and Diaconis wanted to go there but doubted that the Mathematics Department would take a student with a City College degree.
    • Persi was very anxious to get into Harvard.
    • The head of the statistics department at Harvard was Frederick Mosteller, who is a magic buff.
    • When you are dealing from a deck, there is a way to deal the second card instead of the top card, and there is a way to deal the bottom card instead of the top card.) I got back a letter right away from Mosteller, which said, "If he's willing to major in statistics, I can get him into Harvard." So I asked Persi if he was willing to major in statistics, and he said, "Of course!" So he got in, got his Ph.D.
    • He continued to work on it, discussing ideas with Mosteller, during his first year as a graduate student at Harvard and the results were eventually published in the Journal of Number Theory as the three-author paper Second-order terms for the variances and covariances of the number of prime factors-including the square free case (1977).
    • During his first year at Harvard, academic year 1971-72, Diaconis had studied for a Master's Degree and then continued to study at Harvard for a Ph.D.
    • While at Stanford he kept his contacts with Harvard, being a Visiting Professor in the Harvard Department of Statistics in 1981-82 and in the Harvard Department of Mathematics in 1985-86.
    • In 1987 he left Stanford when he was appointed as George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Mathematics at Harvard.

  9. Osgood biography
    • He entered Harvard College in 1882, still intent on studying classics, and for two years he pursued this aim.
    • However F N Cole and B O Peirce, who had begun teaching at Harvard the year before Osgood entered, persuaded him to study mathematics.
    • He was also influenced by two other mathematics lecturers at Harvard, namely James Mills Peirce, the son of Benjamin Peirce, and William Elwood Byerly who was renowned as an excellent teacher.
    • in 1886, coming second out of 286 students, then undertook graduate work at Harvard for a year, graduating with a Master's Degree in 1887.
    • It was the beginning of a new era in graduate education at Harvard ..
    • Cole had attended Klein's lectures at Harvard in 1885-87 on function theory and he persuaded Osgood to go to Gottingen in 1887 and study with Klein.
    • After being awarded a doctorate by Erlangen in 1890 for his thesis Zur Theorie der zum algebraischen Gebilde ym = R(x) gehorigen Ableschen Functionen m = R (x) associated with Abel’s functions',5222)">Ⓣ, he married Theresa Ruprecht and they returned to Harvard.
    • There was no spirit of research at Harvard then, except what Osgood himself brought, but a year later Maxime Bocher joined him there, also a student greatly influenced by Felix Klein, and a man of mathematical background and ideals similar to those of Osgood.
    • At Harvard Osgood was an instructor in mathematics from 1890 to 1893 when he was promoted to assistant professor.
    • Morse, also a professor of mathematics at Harvard, had divorced Celeste in 1930.
    • After he retired from Harvard in 1933, Osgood taught for two years at the National University of Peking.

  10. Stone biography
    • He entered Harvard in 1919 still intending to continue his studies at Harvard law school after first taking his bachelor's degree, but he was so enthused by the mathematics courses that he took that, by the time he graduated in 1922, he began to think that it was mathematics, not law, that would be his life.
    • An inspired, but extraordinary, arrangement by the Harvard Mathematics Department saw him appointed as an instructor for session 1922-23 to see whether he would enjoy teaching mathematics and whether he would decide to take his mathematical studies further.
    • In 1925 he had been appointed as an instructor in mathematics at Columbia University,and he spend two years there before being appointed to Harvard as an instructor in 1927.
    • In 1928 Stone was promoted to associate professor at Harvard.
    • Although he would return to Harvard again in 1933, Stone first accepted a post as associate professor at Yale from 1931 to 1933.
    • Back at Harvard as an associate professor in 1933, he was promoted to full professor there in 1937.
    • Then in 1946 he left Harvard to take up the chairmanship of the mathematics department at the University of Chicago.
    • ','8] Stone explains why he decided to leave Harvard.
    • Stone won the argument, the offer was made to Whitney, but he turned it down preferring to remain at Harvard.

  11. Curry biography
    • He entered Harvard College, the undergraduate school of Harvard University, and took a mathematics course in his first year of study as part of his studies towards a degree in medicine.
    • He continued on the mathematics course at Harvard, however, and graduated in 1920 with an A.B.
    • Also Harvard seemed a better place to study pure science so he returned there, having been appointed to a half-post as a research assistant of P W Bridgeman for the session 1922-23.
    • Curry graduated with a Master's Degree in physics from Harvard in 1924 but by now he realised that the subject for him was not physics but it was mathematics.
    • He began to undertake research for his doctorate in mathematics at Harvard.
    • If one imagines that from 1924 when Curry embarked on his doctorate in mathematics at Harvard he at last found the topic for him, then one would be mistaken.
    • He asked various faculty members at Harvard, and Norbert Wiener at MIT, if they thought he might change to undertake research in logic.
    • He was employed as a half-time instructor in mathematics by Harvard during the first semester of 1926-27 and it was around this time that he read the first volume of Whitehead and Russell's Principia Mathematica which had been published in 1910.
    • He again approached various faculty members at Harvard, and Norbert Wiener at MIT, asking whether they thought that he might write his doctoral dissertation on logic.

  12. Peirce Benjamin biography
    • Benjamin, the subject of this biography, therefore had the same name as his father who was both a state legislator in Massachusetts and also a librarian at Harvard College.
    • Although Harvard had been established for around 170 years at the time of Benjamin's birth, it was still under fairly tight political control and was not an institution of true national standing.
    • This would change through Peirce's life long association with Harvard as its influence steadily increased.
    • Peirce entered Harvard College in 1825 and graduated four years later.
    • Peirce taught at George Bancroft's Round Hill School in Northampton, Massachusetts, from 1829 to 1831, and then was appointed as a tutor at Harvard College in 1831, two years after graduating.
    • He was awarded a Master's Degree by Harvard in 1833 and in the same year he married Sarah Hunt Mills, the daughter of Senator Elijah Hunt Mills.
    • Benjamin and Sarah Peirce had four sons and one daughter, among them Charles Peirce (who also has a biography in this archive) and James Mills Peirce who taught in the Mathematics Department at Harvard, and then from 1890 to 1895 served as Dean of the Graduate School at Harvard and, after that, as Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    • It was at Harvard that Peirce spent the whole of his career from 1831.
    • After the Lawrence Scientific School was founded at Harvard in 1847, Peirce was able to teach graduate level mathematics for the first time in the United States.

  13. Mazur Barry biography
    • He said [',' A Powell, Mazur Named University Professor, Harvard University Gazette (29 October, 1998).','2]:- .
    • In 1959 he moved to Harvard University where he was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows from 1959 to 1962 before joining the mathematics department in 1962 as an Assistant Professor.
    • While a Junior Fellow, Mazur met Grace Dane who was a postgraduate research biologist at Harvard studying the microarchitecture of silkworms.
    • He was named William Petschek Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University in 1982.
    • The number concept led to deep mathematics, as Mazur explained [',' A Powell, Mazur Named University Professor, Harvard University Gazette (29 October, 1998).','2]:- .
    • Mazur was named Gerhard Gade University Professor at Harvard University in 1998.
    • Neil Rudenstine, President of Harvard, said [',' A Powell, Mazur Named University Professor, Harvard University Gazette (29 October, 1998).','2]:- .
    • Jeremy Knowles, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, said:- .

  14. Peirce Charles biography
    • His older brother was James Mills Peirce who became a mathematician in the Mathematics Department at Harvard, and then from 1890 to 1895 served as Dean of the Graduate School at Harvard and, after that, as Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    • He entered Harvard College in 1855 and graduated four years later with an A.B., continuing to study there at graduate level for a year.
    • In 1861 he entered the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard, where again his father played an important role, and here he seems to have shone much more than in his undergraduate years.
    • He received a Master's degree from Harvard in 1862 and then a Sc.B.
    • He had studied species classification with Louis Agassiz, a Harvard zoologist.
    • He gave the Harvard lectures on The Logic of Science in the spring of 1865 and the Lowell Institute lectures on The Logic of Science; or Induction and Hypothesis in the latter part of 1866.
    • He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on 30 January 1867, then from October 1869 to December 1872 he conducted research in astronomy as an assistant at Harvard Observatory.
    • Peirce lectured on Pragmatism at Harvard in March to May of 1903 and published a series of essays explaining his ideas in The Monist in 1905.
    • Here is a report of a lecture that Peirce gave to the Harvard Philosophy Club on 21 May 1879 extracted from a letter written by Thomas Davidson:- .

  15. Knorr biography
    • In 1963 he entered Harvard University and graduated with his B.A.
    • Remaining at Harvard, he studied for a Master's Degree and was awarded his A.M.
    • Like Knorr, Joseph W Dauben began undertaking research on the history of mathematics at Harvard in 1966.
    • I Bernard Cohen, at Harvard, served as IBM's chief historical consultant.
    • We note that I Bernard Cohen (1914-2003) was a professor of the history of science at Harvard who had studied for his doctorate under George Sarton.
    • At Harvard, Knorr's thesis advisors were John Emery Murdoch (1927-2010) and Gwilym Ellis Lane Owen (1922-1982).
    • He had been appointed to Harvard in 1966.
    • Murdoch was Professor of History of Science at Harvard and Chair of the Department from 1966 to 1971 and again from 1974 to 1975.
    • From 1968 to 1971 Knorr was a teaching fellow and teaching assistant at Harvard and, after this, he was appointed as a junior faculty member at the University of California in Berkeley.
    • Next we quote from [',' Wilbur Richard Knorr, Harvard University Department of the History of Science Newsletter (2) (Fall, 1997), 5.','11]:- .

  16. Wiener Norbert biography
    • There Leo brought in money by taking a variety of teaching and other positions and eventually was appointed as an Instructor in Slavic Languages at Harvard.
    • He remained at Harvard University for the rest of his career, being eventually promoted to professor.
    • In 1909 Wiener graduated from Tufts at age fourteen and entered Harvard to begin graduate studies.
    • Rather against his father's advice, Wiener began graduate studies in zoology at Harvard.
    • Taking mathematics and philosophy courses, Wiener did not have a successful year and before it was finished his father had made the necessary arrangements to return to Harvard to continue philosophy.
    • Back at Harvard Wiener was strongly influenced by the fine teaching of Edward Huntington on mathematical philosophy.
    • from Harvard at the age of 18 with a dissertation on mathematical logic supervised by Karl Schmidt.
    • From Harvard Wiener went to Cambridge, England, to study under Russell who told him that in order to study the philosophy of mathematics he needed to know more mathematics so he attended courses by G H Hardy.
    • Back in the United States he taught philosophy courses at Harvard in 1915, worked for a while for the General Electric Company, then joined Encyclopedia Americana as a staff writer in Albany.

  17. Birkhoff biography
    • He entered the University of Chicago in 1902, spending a year there, then moved to Harvard University where he studied from 1903 to 1905.
    • While at Harvard he submitted the results he had obtained with Vandiver to the Annals of Mathematics in 1904 and this joint number theory paper became his first publication.
    • During these two years at Harvard the teacher who influenced him most was Bocher who taught him algebra and classical analysis.
    • by Harvard in 1905 and his A.M.
    • During his two years at Harvard, one in college and one in the graduate school, Bocher and Osgood were in their prime; but during the next two years [at Chicago] he worked under Eliakim Moore, Bolza and Maschke, in the most inspiring mathematical center in the United States at that time.
    • In the following year he moved to Harvard as an assistant professor, he was promoted to full professor there in 1919, remaining at Harvard for the rest of his life.
    • He was named Perkins Professor at Harvard in 1932, then in 1936 he became Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science.
    • He also helped some Jewish refugees find jobs NOT at Harvard in the 1930s, while acting generally to hinder their entry.

  18. Walsh Joseph biography
    • In 1912 he entered Columbia University but, after one year of study, transferred to Harvard University.
    • After being awarded a Master's degree by the University of Wisconsin in 1917 he returned to Harvard where he was appointed as an instructor in mathematics.
    • He served on troop transport vessels in the North Atlantic until he returned to his position in Harvard in 1919.
    • Walsh was awarded his doctorate by Harvard in 1920 for his thesis On the location of the roots of a Jacobian of two binary forms, and of the derivative of a rational function.
    • Back at Harvard he was appointed as an instructor in 1921, then three years later was promoted to assistant professor.
    • Rising steadily through the ranks at Harvard he was promoted to associate professor in 1930, then full professor in 1935.
    • During this 1921-1942 Harvard period, he had spent a year (1925-26) at the University of Munich where he worked with Caratheodory, and a year at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton (1934-35).
    • He returned to Harvard after his war service in 1946 when he was named Perkins Professor of Mathematics.
    • After retiring from Harvard he moved to the University of Maryland choosing his home in College Park which [',' D V Widder, Joseph Leonard Walsh, J.

  19. Birkhoff Garrett biography
    • His parents had encouraged him to do this because they were going on a major year long tour and so, after passing the examinations, Garrett attended a boarding school at Lake Placid for a year, spending much time on sport, before he entered Harvard University in 1928.
    • Before he entered Harvard, Birkhoff's father pressed him to decide on what profession he would eventually follow.
    • With lecturers such as Morse and Whitney, Birkhoff certainly had inspiring teachers at Harvard.
    • Birkhoff graduated from Harvard in 1932 and was awarded a Henry Fellowship to study at Cambridge University in England.
    • Returning to the United States, Birkhoff was a member of the Society of Fellows at Harvard from 1933 to 1936, and then he was appointed as an instructor at Harvard in 1936.
    • Mac Lane had been at Harvard during 1934-36 and in 1937 Birkhoff taught his first undergraduate course on abstract algebra.
    • When Mac Lane returned to Harvard in 1938 he took over teaching Birkhoff's undergraduate algebra course, then Mac Lane took the course back in 1939.
    • In 1969 Birkhoff was appointed George Putnam Professor of Pure and Applied Mathematics at Harvard.

  20. Abhyankar biography
    • Kosambi strongly advised Abhyankar to make a career in mathematics while Masani, who had connections in Harvard, managed to arrange for Abhyankar to be admitted there to study for his Ph.D.
    • He could not go to Harvard without financial support, so he applied for funds from various Indian sources until he believed he had enough to live on in the United States.
    • Once better, he continued to the United States but the semester was more than half finished before he reached Harvard.
    • Abhyankar was awarded a Master's Degree by Harvard in 1952 and continued to study there for his doctorate advised by Zariski.
    • from Harvard in 1955 for his thesis Local Uniformization on Algebraic Surfaces over Modular Ground Fields.
    • Abhyankar's interest in resolution of singularities began when he was a graduate student at Harvard in the mid-1950s.
    • Although he produced remarkable results while a graduate student at Harvard, nevertheless these were difficult times financially for the young man.
    • However, after one year he was awarded financial support by Harvard and his financial problems were eased.
    • Since Ram had studied at Harvard, getting his Ph.D.

  21. Varga biography
    • (I had taken courses in statistics and probability.) He said to me, "I have had you as a student in several classes, and I think you should apply to Harvard University for graduate work in mathematics.
    • It's too late now to get any financial assistance from Harvard, but if you can borrow money from your father for the first year of graduate work at Harvard, I am quite sure that you will receive scholarships and financial support for the remaining years of your studies." Then, he looked at me, smiling, and said, "Bet on yourself!" Following his advice, I applied in late July, 1950, and was accepted for graduate work in September in mathematics at Harvard University .
    • He continued to undertake research at Harvard with Joseph Leonard Walsh as his thesis advisor.
    • On finishing at Harvard, I received teaching offers from several colleges in the Cleveland area, but the Korean war was on, and, being 1A in the draft, I fully expected to be drafted into the Army after taking such a teaching position.
    • But, by chance, a mathematician, Henry L Garabedian (who had been a professor of mathematics at Northwestern), had taken a job with the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory in Pittsburgh, and he came to Harvard to recruit people to Bettis, to work on problems related to nuclear reactors; the government deemed such work as "essential".
    • We mentioned above Varga's joint work with Garrett Birkhoff who he first got to know at Harvard.

  22. Quillen biography
    • He won a scholarship which enabled him to attend Newark Academy, a highly rated private secondary school, and, a year before he should have completed his schooling at Newark Academy, he won a scholarship to study mathematics at Harvard University.
    • Dan's mother had discovered that Harvard had a special programme for talented students to begin their studies a year earlier than normal so, having won the scholarship, he was able to miss out the last year of secondary school and enter Harvard in September 1957.
    • As a Harvard University student, Quillen took part in the 20th Individual and Team Putnam Competition in 1959 and was named as a Putnam Fellow.
    • He then began research at Harvard under Raoul Bott's supervision.
    • at Harvard.
    • While just beginning to study for his Master's Degree at Harvard for his Ph.D., on 3 June 1961, Quillen married Jean Plesset.
    • They first saw each other when Quillen took a first year chemistry class in his second year of undergraduate study, but it was their common love of music that brought them together for they met regularly through the Harvard orchestra.

  23. Hedrick biography
    • He then spent a year as a teacher of mathematics at the High School in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, before beginning graduate studies at Harvard University in 1897.
    • W B Ford writes that at Harvard [',' W B Ford, Obituary: Earle Raymond Hedrick, Amer.
    • At Harvard his studies were directed by Maxime Bocher and William Osgood among others and he was awarded his Master's degree in 1898.
    • While at Harvard he wrote his first paper On three dimensional determinants (1899/1900) which was published in the Annals of Mathematics.
    • Cairns was a graduate student at Harvard from 1896 to 1898 so overlapped with Hedrick for two years.
    • He had received a Parker fellowship from Harvard to study abroad and it is likely that he advised Hedrick to follow the same course.
    • Harvard awarded Hedrick a scholarship for a third year to study at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris and there he spent part of 1901 in contact with Edouard Goursat, Emile Picard, Jacques Hadamard, Paul Appell and Jules Tannery.
    • We noted above that W D Cairns and Hedrick were friends from their time as graduate students at Harvard.

  24. Stringham biography
    • However, Stringham now aimed higher and was intent on studying at Harvard College.
    • During the year 1872-73 he applied for admission to Harvard and, despite his unusual educational background, he was accepted.
    • He began his studies at Harvard in September 1873 and lived at 43 College House with Richard Smith Culbreth who became a lawyer.
    • Stringham received honours in mathematics in his second year at Harvard College and earned the highest honours in mathematics when he graduated with an A.B.
    • After graduating from Harvard College, Stringham was a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University in 1877-78 where he worked towards his doctorate.
    • In the same year he was awarded a Parker Fellowship by Harvard and, funded by this, he went to Europe.
    • He tried to get either Johns Hopkins or Harvard to award him a position which would allow him to spend another year in Europe but he was not successful.
    • Mellen Woodman Haskell (1863-1948) was an undergraduate at Harvard and then undertook research for his doctorate supervised by Felix Klein at Leipzig and Gottingen.

  25. Hau biography
    • In 1988 she went to Harvard University in the United States and there she met Jene A Golovchenko and discusses her future research ideas with him.
    • He worked both at Harvard and at the Rowland Institute for Science in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which had been founded by the inventor of Polaroid photography, Edwin H Land:- .
    • Her first year as a postdoctoral assistant was funded by the Carlsberg Scholarship but she was later appointed Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics at Harvard as well as Principal Investigator for the Atom Cooling Group at the Rowland Institute.
    • On 18 February 1999 the journal Nature selected for its cover article the paper Light speed reduction to 17 metres per second in an ultracold atomic gas written by Hau in collaboration with Stephen Harris of Stanford University and two Harvard graduate students Zachary Dutton and Cyrus Behroozi.
    • In 1999 Hau was named Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics at Harvard University.
    • She is now Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard.
    • and the Ledlie Prize from Harvard University (September 2008).
    • Harvard .

  26. Boas biography
    • In 1929 he entered Harvard University.
    • Boas had such a wide range of interests that he had deliberately chosen Harvard as giving him the largest number of options.
    • by Harvard in 1924 for his thesis Theorems of Mean Value and Trigonometric Interpolation.
    • He spent 1933-34 travelling round Europe before returning in the autumn of 1934 to begin graduate studies at Harvard.
    • They had first met in May 1937 when Smithies had visited Harvard to give a seminar.
    • After a few months the Navy decided they did not want non-military teachers at the Pre-Flight School and Boas was recruited to teach in the military training program at Harvard.
    • Once there he taught courses in the military training program and also some regular Harvard courses.
    • He was slight and agile; he jumped up on desks with balletic flair; and in the days when he was a member of the Otto Neugebauer group at Brown University he was nicknamed "The Squirrel." Many remember Ralph walking down Garden Street, green bookbag over his shoulder, on the way to Harvard Square, South Station, and Providence through sun, rain and snow.

  27. Rallis biography
    • After High School, he entered Harvard University where he studied mathematics.
    • At Harvard he was a resident of Winthrop House, one of the Harvard Colleges, and was awarded AB, magna cum laude in mathematics, in 1964.
    • In fact he met his future wife Michele Kaufman while he was copying his thesis in Harvard Square.
    • at Harvard advised by David Layzer, a cosmologist.
    • She had just completed writing her Harvard Ph.D.
    • thesis in astronomy and, like Rallis, was in Harvard Square to make copies of the thesis.

  28. Doob biography
    • At this stage in his education, given his hobby, he felt that physics was the right subject for him to study at university, and having sought advice from the principal of his high school, he applied to study at Harvard.
    • When he entered Harvard in September 1926 he registered for courses in physics but, by the end of his first year of study, Doob had decided that he did not want to proceed to a physics degree.
    • Doob was awarded a AB by Harvard in 1930 and asked his advisor Marshall Stone if he would supervise his doctorate.
    • Harvard suited my character in that there was so little supervision that I could neglect classes for a considerable time while cultivating a side interest, sometimes mathematical sometimes not.
    • The ideas which led him to study the relation between analytic functions and their limit values at the boundaries of their domains came through questions that he was asked by Wladimir Seidel who was a postdoctoral assistant at Harvard at the time.
    • However, the level of undergraduate mathematics at Harvard at this time was not particularly high, so with only two years of highly specialised research after his undergraduate degree, Doob had not obtained a broad mathematical education:- .
    • I had missed fertile contact with Birkhoff, Kellogg, and Morse, all three at Harvard and leaders in their fields.

  29. Hironaka biography
    • At some point Zariski said, "Maybe you can come to Harvard and study." And I said, "Okay." .
    • Hironaka went to the United States in the summer of 1957 where he continued his studies at Harvard.
    • While at Harvard, Hironaka became friends with Alexander Grothendieck who spent the academic year 1958-59 there.
    • from Harvard in 1960 for his thesis On the Theory of Birational Blowing-up.
    • After completing his studies at Harvard, Hironaka was appointed to the staff at Brandeis University.
    • After being on the faculty at Brandeis University, Hironaka was appointed to Colombia University, and then to Harvard in 1968.
    • On 4-5 May 2009 the Clay Mathematics Institute held its 2009 Clay Research Conference in Harvard Science Center.

  30. Morse biography
    • from Colby College in 1914, gaining distinction, and from there he entered Harvard to undertake research in mathematics.
    • He obtained a Master's Degree from Harvard in 1915 then continued to work there on his doctoral dissertation which was directed by G D Birkhoff.
    • Morse taught briefly at Harvard before entering military service for the period of World War I.
    • He was Benjamin Peirce Instructor at Harvard in 1919-20 and he then became an assistant professor at Cornell (1920-1925) and Brown University (1925-1926).
    • From 1926 until 1935 he was at Harvard, serving as assistant professor (1926-28), associate professor (1928-29), and professor from 1929 to 1935.
    • At the time of the divorce Morse was a professor at Harvard, and there was a scandal in August 1932 when Celeste Phelps married Osgood, a colleague of Morse's at Harvard.

  31. Bocher biography
    • Maxime's father, Ferdinand Bocher, was professor of modern languages at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when Maxime was born and, in 1872, he became Professor of French at Harvard.
    • After this he studied at Harvard University, receiving his first degree from there in 1888.
    • His course at Harvard was a broad one for, in addition to mathematics, he studied a remarkably wide range of topics including Latin, chemistry, philosophy, zoology, geography, geology, meteorology, Roman and mediaeval art, and music.
    • Bocher was awarded a Harvard Fellowship, a Harris Fellowship and a Parker Fellowship which allowed him to travel to Europe to undertake research.
    • He returned with his new wife to Harvard where he was appointed as an instructor.
    • His final book was Lecons sur les methodes de Sturm dans la theorie des equations differentielles lineaires et leurs developpements modernes (1917) which was a record of lectures he gave in Paris in 1913-14 when he was Harvard Exchange Professor at the University of Paris.

  32. Story biography
    • He graduated from Harvard, earned a Ph.D.
    • He entered Harvard College in 1867.
    • Although the College had been founded in 1638 it only became a nationally important institution during Charles W Eliot's term as Harvard's president from 1869 to1909.
    • After the award of his doctorate, Story returned to Harvard where he was appointed as a tutor.
    • He had already come to know Benjamin Peirce when he was an undergraduate at Harvard and now back at Harvard he impressed Peirce yet further with his abilities.

  33. MacLane biography
    • A couple of weeks after this he received a letter from Harvard offering him an appointment for a year as Benjamin Peirce Instructor.
    • Offered the option of giving the advanced course at Harvard on logic or algebra, he opted for algebra and he began to move in that direction.
    • He spent two years at Harvard and left to take up a post of instructor at Cornell for session 1936-37.
    • He spent the following session back at Chicago, working in algebra and getting much help from Adrian Albert, before accepting an appointment as an assistant professor at Harvard which he took up in 1938.
    • It was during the years at Harvard (1938-47) that he wrote his famous text A survey of modern algebra with Garrett Birkhoff which was published in 1941.
    • I went back to Harvard, happy to go back to mathematics.

  34. Jackson Dunham biography
    • In 1904, when only sixteen years old, Jackson began his studies at Harvard University.
    • Although mathematics was the main subject that Jackson studied at Harvard, he also took courses in astronomy, chemistry, physics, classical languages and modern languages.
    • Jackson graduated from Harvard with an A.B (with distinction in mathematics) in 1908 and an A.M.
    • Harvard awarded him the Rogers Fellowship for his studies at Gottingen for 1909-10 and the Edward William Hopper Fellowship for the following year.
    • Back in the United States, Jackson was appointed as an Instructor in Mathematics at Harvard in 1911 and, five years later, was promoted to Assistant Professor.
    • In fact the offer from Minnesota was a difficult one for Jackson for, on the one hand, it was a major promotion but, on the other hand, he was moving from Harvard with its big graduate school in mathematics to a place with no graduate school in the subject.

  35. Cole biography
    • After Frank graduated from High School in Marlboro, Massachusetts, he was privately tutored before he entered Harvard University in 1878.
    • Cole returned to Harvard and wrote a thesis A Contribution to the Theory of the General Equation of the Sixth Degree which, as the title indicates, studied equations of degree 6.
    • Cole presented this thesis to Harvard University, not to Gottingen University, for his Ph.D.
    • While he completed writing his doctoral thesis, Cole had already begun to lecture at Harvard and he continued to lecture there until 1887.
    • During the year 1887-88 Cole was a tutor at Harvard, then in the summer at the end of that academic year he married Martha Marie Streiff of Gottingen on 26 July; they had one daughter and three sons.
    • He brought the latest mathematical research topics to his lectures and was a major factor in improving mathematical education at Harvard.

  36. Franklin biography
    • After his year as an instructor at Princeton, in 1922 Franklin went to Harvard University where he was appointed a Benjamin Peirce Instructor.
    • In 1948 he lectured on mathematical physics at Harvard University.
    • At various times a member of the faculties of Princeton, Harvard and the Institute for Advanced Study, and now professor of mathematics in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, your colleagues consider you one of the outstanding mathematicians in the United States.
    • Coming to Harvard first then to MIT he brought a new field to Cambridge.
    • "Franklin", Marshall Stone writes, "gave us [Harvard] our first systematic introduction to topology." In the MIT Journal of 1933-34 he extended his studies to the six-colour problem for one-sided surfaces.

  37. Hopper biography
    • After initial training at Midshipman's School, after which she was commissioned a Lieutenant, Hopper was assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at the Cruft Laboratories at Harvard University.
    • From 1944 she worked with Aiken on the Harvard Mark I computer [',' Grace Murray Hopper, in The Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 1994 Conference (Washington, DC, 1994).','7]:- .
    • Aiken gave her as a first programming task immediately she arrived at Harvard which was to:- .
    • By the end of the war, Hopper was working on the Harvard Mark II computer.
    • She resigned her post at Vassar College so that she could remain at Harvard where she was appointed a Research Fellow in Engineering Sciences and Applied Physics in the Computation Laboratory.

  38. Mosteller biography
    • After completing work for his thesis at Princeton, Mosteller was appointed as a lecturer in the Social Relations Department at Harvard University.
    • In 1957 the Statistics Department was set up at Harvard and Mosteller, who had been a leading figure in its creation, became its first chairman.
    • It was at Harvard that Mosteller became interested in applying statistical techniques to assist in healthcare.
    • His career at Harvard reflected this interest in healthcare.
    • He was awarded honorary degrees from the University of Chicago (1973), Carnegie-Mellon University (1974), Yale University (1981), Wesleyan University (1983) and Harvard University (1991).

  39. Coolidge biography
    • Coolidge was educated at Harvard from where he received his B.A.
    • In 1899 Coolidge was appointed as an instructor at Harvard and, three years later, he became an assistant professor there.
    • After spending two years in Europe, Coolidge returned to Harvard where he taught for most of his career (the exception being 1927 when he returned to the Sorbonne in Paris as an exchange professor).
    • During World War I he served as a major in the US Army and, at the end of the war in 1918, he was promoted to full professor at Harvard.
    • In 1927 Coolidge was appointed as chairman of the Mathematics Department at Harvard.

  40. Voevodsky biography
    • Voevodsky moved to Harvard University in the United States where he completed his doctorate supervised by David Kazhdan.
    • Beginning with his Harvard Ph.D.
    • Then he became a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows at Harvard University from July 1993 to July 1996.
    • During this period, in 1996-97, he was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University and at the Max-Planck Institute in Germany.

  41. Ahlfors biography
    • In 1935, Constantin Caratheodory, whom Ahlfors had met in Munich during his travels, recommended him for a post at Harvard in the United States.
    • In 1938 Ahlfors was offered a chair in mathematics at the University of Helsinki and, being rather homesick, he accepted this rather than remain permanently at Harvard.
    • An offer from Harvard in 1946 was therefore gladly accepted and, on this occasion, he remained there, retiring in 1977.
    • Two years after taking up the appointment at Harvard, Ahlfors was elected Chairman of the Mathematics Department.
    • James Jenkins writes about Ahlfors' early years at Harvard in [',' R Bott, C Earle, D Hejhal, J Jenkins, T Jorgensen, S G Krantz (ed.), A Marden and R Osserman, Lars Valerian Ahlfors (1907-1996), Notices Amer.

  42. Gleason biography
    • After undertaking this war service, he was appointed as a Junior Fellow at Harvard in 1946.
    • A consequence of this is that he never wrote a doctoral thesis - given the Junior Fellowship there was no need for him to do so [',' D B Ruder, Symposium to Celebrate Gleason, Society of Fellows (Harvard Gazette Archives, 9 May 1996).','2]:- .
    • Given his experience in the US Navy, it was natural for him to return to serve during the Korean War and he took a two year break from Harvard to serve during the war which lasted from the middle of 1950 to the middle of 1953.
    • Gleason was steadily promoted at Harvard, becoming a full professor in 1957.
    • Shing-Tung Yau, chair of the Mathematics Department at Harvard gave this tribute:- .

  43. Whitney biography
    • Whitney attended Yale University where he received his first degree in 1928, then continued to undertake mathematical research at the University of Harvard from where his doctorate was awarded in 1932.
    • He continued to work at Harvard, being appointed an instructor in mathematics from 1930 until 1935, although the years 1931-33 were spent as a National Research Council Research Fellow at Harvard and Princeton.
    • Hassler Whitney, then at Harvard, joined the group at Columbia working on questions concerning fire control systems, that is, systems which control the aiming of weaponry, especially on aircraft and rockets.
    • Harvard made Whitney a full professor in 1946 and he held this professorship until he accepted an offer from the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton of a professorship in 1952.

  44. Brauer biography
    • In 1951 Harvard University offered him a chair and, in 1952, he took up the position in Harvard which he was to hold until he retired in 1971.
    • However we have not yet mentioned the work which in many ways was his most famous and this he began around the time he took up the chair at Harvard.
    • 10 (1978), 317-342.','6] points out that when Brauer went to Harvard he was 51 years old, yet almost half his total of 147 publications were published after this date.
    • He certainly did not sit quietly working away in Harvard.

  45. Robbins biography
    • He entered Harvard University in 1931, when only sixteen tears old, and took courses on literature but he also took a calculus course [',' W Page, Herbert Robbins, in D J Albers, G L Alexanderson (eds.), Mathematical People (Birkhauser, Boston-Basel-Stuttgart, 1985), 283-297.','4] or [',' W Page and H Robbins, An Interview with Herbert Robbins, The College Mathematics Journal 15 (1) (1984), 2-24.','5]:- .
    • Having just entered Harvard with practically no high school mathematics, I knew calculus would be useful if I ever wanted to study any of the sciences.
    • At the end of my freshman year, much to my surprise I was asked by the mathematics department to join the Harvard math team.
    • from Harvard in 1935 and remained there undertaking graduate studies.
    • Hassler Whitney had come back from a topology conference in Moscow around 1936, and in a talk at Harvard on some of the topics discussed at the conference, he mentioned an unsolved problem that seemed to be important.

  46. Huntington biography
    • Huntington attended Harvard College, and he was awarded his A.B.
    • He had already been appointed as an instructor at Harvard after completing his first degree and he held this post while studying for his Master's degree.
    • Returning to the United States, Huntington again was appointed as an instructor in Harvard in 1901.
    • Huntington was promoted to associate professor in 1915 and to professor of mechanics at Harvard in 1919.
    • He was an advocate of the use of calculating machines and he had a mechanical calculator on his desk in his Harvard office.

  47. Evans biography
    • He then entered Harvard University and showed outstanding ability.
    • It was under Bocher's supervision that Evans began research at Harvard, being awarded his Master's degree in 1908 and his doctorate in 1910.
    • Already before completing his Ph.D., Evans had been employed as an instructor at Harvard in session 1909-10.
    • He won a Sheldon Travelling Fellowship from Harvard which enabled him to spend 1910 to 1912 studying in Europe.
    • He turned down an attractive offer from them in 1927 and he also turned down several offers from Harvard.

  48. Kaplansky biography
    • from Toronto, continuing his studies at Harvard University after being awarded a Putnam Fellowship (in fact he was the first recipient of this award).
    • He was awarded a doctorate by Harvard in 1941, the year after he had become a citizen of the United States.
    • His thesis supervisor at Harvard was Mac Lane and Kaplansky's thesis was entitled Maximal Fields with Valuations.
    • Kaplansky was appointed a Benjamin Peirce Instructor in Harvard that year and he continued to hold that post there until 1944.

  49. Hopf Eberhard biography
    • In 1930 Hopf received a fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation to study classical mechanics with Birkhoff at Harvard in the United States.
    • He arrived Cambridge, Massachusetts in October of 1930 but his official affiliation was not the Harvard Mathematics Department but, instead, the Harvard College Observatory.
    • While in the Harvard College Observatory he worked on many mathematical and astronomical subjects including topology and ergodic theory.

  50. Beurling biography
    • Ahlfors wrote (see for example [',' S Nardis, A History in Sum (Harvard University Press, 2013).','4]):- .
    • During the session 1948-49 Beurling was a visiting professor at Harvard in the United States.
    • "You Harvard men seem to be afraid of integral signs," he exclaimed on one occasion.
    • After the year at Harvard, he returned to Sweden.

  51. Lyndon biography
    • He graduated from Derby School in 1935 and entered Harvard University with the aim of studying literature so that he might become a writer.
    • The move to mathematics was made and he graduated from Harvard in 1939.
    • Having worked for a year in a bank in Albuquerque, Lyndon returned to Harvard, being awarded a Master's Degree in 1941.
    • He taught at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta during session 1941-42, then he returned to Harvard for the third time in 1942 and there taught navigation as part of the V-12 Program while he studied for his doctorate.

  52. Lorch Ray biography
    • Obtaining a university position would have been almost impossible for Lorch but, fortunately for him, he was awarded a National Research Council Fellowship to finance a year of postdoctoral study at Harvard University working with Marshall Stone.
    • Three others with a National Research Council Fellowship arrived in Harvard at this time, namely Magnus Hestenes (1906-1991), David Solomon Nathan (1903-1957) and Deane Montgomery.
    • This extra year at Harvard was supposed to give us a "coat of varnish," as one of my friends put it.
    • Back at Harvard, he received a letter from Columbia University offering him a Cutting Traveling Fellowship.

  53. Mumford biography
    • After attending Exeter School, Mumford entered Harvard University.
    • It was at Harvard that Mumford first became interested in algebraic varieties.
    • After graduating from Harvard, Mumford was appointed to the staff there.
    • He was chairman of the Mathematics Department at Harvard from 1981 to 1984 and MacArthur Fellow from 1987 to 1992.

  54. Murray biography
    • After spending a year at King's College in Newcastle, Murray, who had always wanted to go to the United States, went to Harvard University where he spent 1956-57 as a postdoctoral student supported by a Sir James Caird Travelling Scholarship.
    • He remained at Harvard for two further years (1957-59) as Gordon MacKay Lecturer and Research Fellow in Applied Mathematics.
    • During this time he was also a Tutor in Applied Mathematics at Leverett House, the largest Residential House at Harvard.
    • He returned to the United States in 1963 and was appointed as Research Associate in Engineering and Applied Physics at Harvard.

  55. Nash biography
    • By this time he had been accepted into the mathematics programme at Harvard, Princeton, Chicago and Michigan.
    • He felt that Harvard was the leading university and so he wanted to go there, but on the other hand their offer to him was less generous than that of Princeton.
    • Nash felt that Princeton were keen that he went there while he felt that his lack of success in the Putnam Mathematics Competition meant that Harvard were less enthusiastic.
    • He recently heard of the unsolved problem about imbedding a Riemannian manifold isometrically in Euclidean space, felt that this was his sort of thing, provided the problem were sufficiently worthwhile to justify his efforts; so he proceeded to write to everyone in the math society to check on that, was told that it probably was, and proceeded to announce that he had solved it, modulo details, and told Mackey he would like to talk about it at the Harvard colloquium.

  56. Hellman biography
    • We note that, at that time, Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, served as a women's college coordinating with the famous men's Harvard College.
    • Students at Radcliffe were taught by professors employed at Harvard College.
    • Pepper, who had graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, practiced law in Manhattan from 1930.

  57. Ford biography
    • He then undertook research at Harvard with Maxime Bocher as his advisor, graduating M.A.
    • He then proceeded to Harvard University where he spent two years, graduating M.A.
    • After Mathematics, Chess is his hobby, and he played that game in the Harvard Chess Team.
    • Ford returned to the United States and completed work for a doctorate at Harvard University.

  58. Artin Michael biography
    • from Princeton in 1955 and, later that year, went to Harvard for graduate studies.
    • His first year was not, by his own account, too successful although he was awarded a Master's Degree by Harvard in 1956.
    • by Harvard in 1960 for his thesis On Enriques' Surfaces.
    • After the award of his doctorate in 1960, Artin was appointed as a Benjamin Peirce Lecturer at Harvard.

  59. Steenrod biography
    • Then things got better for Steenrod, for the quality of the paper led quickly to offers of fellowships from Harvard, Princeton and Duke.
    • Again he decided to make some money and before taking up the Harvard fellowship, the one he had decided to accept, so he worked at the Flint Chevrolet plant as a die designer using again the skills he had learnt from his brother.
    • Before he had completed his year at Harvard he was offered fellowships for the following year by both Harvard and Duke.

  60. Valiant biography
    • In Edinburgh he was promoted to reader in 1981 but went to the United States in 1982 when he was a visiting professor at Harvard.
    • Later that year he was appointed Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at Harvard.
    • He remained at Harvard, although he spent the year 1987-88 as a visiting fellow at the University of Oxford in England.
    • In 2001 he was named T Jefferson Coolidge Professor of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics in the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  61. Hayes David biography
    • He worked there for three years before spending the academic year 1966-67 as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University.
    • He made research visits to Harvard University in autumn of 1981, to the University of California at San Diego in autumn of 1983, to Imperial College of Science and Technology in London, England, in the spring of 1989, and to Harvard University in autumn of 1999.
    • We mentioned above that Hayes spent time at Harvard University in the autumn of 1999 and while he was there he delivered a series of lectures on the Stark conjectures.

  62. Dickson biography
    • Dickson applied for doctoral fellowships at both Harvard and Chicago.
    • He accepted an offer from Harvard but, on receiving a later offer from Chicago, changed his mind.
    • As a final comment on honours given to Dickson, we note that Princeton (1941) and Harvard (1936) were among the universities that awarded him an honorary degrees.

  63. Hazlett biography
    • This College, which existed from the 1870s as somewhere women could obtain informal education by Faculty members from Harvard University, was given the right to award degrees in 1894 after moves to admit women directly to Harvard failed.
    • Following the award of the doctorate Hazlett was awarded an Alice Freeman Palmer which enabled her to attend Harvard during 1915-1916.

  64. Montgomery biography
    • In 1933-34 he was National Research Council Fellow at Harvard.
    • In 1934-35 Montgomery was National Research Council Fellow at Princeton having decided to make a change from Harvard:- .
    • In fact he was offered an assistant professorship at Harvard in 1938 but he chose to remain at Smith College.

  65. Kellogg biography
    • At the end of the war he was appointed to Harvard University to replace Maxime Bocher who died in September 1918.
    • His first appointment to Harvard was as a lecturer but in 1920, the year following his appointment, he was promoted to associate professor, then to full professor in 1927.
    • Kellogg continued to work at Harvard until his death which resulted from a heart attack which he suffered while climbing near Greenville, Maine.

  66. Tarski biography
    • In August 1939 Tarski travelled to Harvard University in the United States to attend another Unity of Science meeting.
    • Tarski held a number of temporary research positions: Harvard from 1939 to 1941; City College of New York in 1940; and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton in 1941-42 when he held a Guggenheim Fellowship.
    • In a lecture given at Harvard during 1939-40 Tarski said:- .

  67. Van Vleck biography
    • We should record here that John Hasbrouck Van Vleck was educated at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and then at Harvard University where he received his doctorate in 1922.
    • He worked at the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin, then Harvard University where he was Hollis professor of mathematics and natural philosophy from 1951 to 1969.
    • The Harvard group was particularly adamant: Osgood, I remember father said, claimed he suffered from insomnia if he left Cambridge.

  68. Ulam biography
    • At the Institute for Advanced Study he met G D Birkhoff who invited him to Harvard University.
    • I went back to Poland, but the next fall I returned to Cambridge as a member of the so-called Society of Fellows, a new Harvard institution.
    • I became a lecturer at Harvard in 1940, but every year during that time I commuted between Poland and the United States.

  69. Eisenbud biography
    • He was a visiting scholar at Harvard University during 1973-74 and then was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Vancouver in August 1974.
    • Following this he again took research leave spending the academic year 1986-87 as a Visiting Professor at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at Berkeley and the following academic year as a Visiting Professor at Harvard University.
    • He made a research visit after this period as Chairman, spending the autumn term of 1994 at Harvard University and the spring term of 1995 at l'Institut Henri Poincare in Paris.

  70. Kruskal William biography
    • Trying to find answers to foundational problems led him to read work by Quine and, once he realised that Quine taught at Harvard, Kruskal tried to change to complete his degree there.
    • He entered Harvard in 1938, taking a joint programme in mathematics and philosophy so he could attend the courses he found most attractive.
    • After graduating from Harvard with an S.B.

  71. Bernstein Sergi biography
    • Whether Hilbert sought to help is unclear, but Bernstein received an offer of a position at Harvard University from William Osgood.
    • In the spring of 1910 Bernstein went to Gottingen to talk to Dunham Jackson who was visiting Gottingen from Harvard.
    • It is unclear what happened but Bernstein gave up the chance of going to Harvard and, after his Gottingen visit, returned to Kharkov.

  72. Gorenstein biography
    • His secondary schooling was at Boston Latin School from which he graduated, entering Harvard University.
    • Gorenstein graduated in 1943 and, to contribute to the war effort, he accepted a teaching position at Harvard to teach mathematics to army personnel.
    • At the end of World War II, Gorenstein returned to Harvard, this time to undertake graduate work with Zariski.

  73. Sylow biography
    • It is interesting to note that in 1902, when Sylow gave the welcoming address at a conference to mark the centenary of Niels Abel's birth, he said (see [',' A R Alexander, Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern Mathematics (Harvard University Press, 2010).','2]):- .
    • He said (see [',' A R Alexander, Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern Mathematics (Harvard University Press, 2010).','2]):- .
    • [Gauss and Cauchy] initiated that great movement, which has run through the whole of the previous [','Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern Mathematics (Harvard University Press, 2010).','19th] century, and which has reformed mathematics from its foundations at the same time it enriched it with new theories.

  74. Hsiung biography
    • Hassler Whitney then invited Hsiung to become his research assistant at Harvard and Hsiung took up this position in the spring of 1951.
    • I benefited very much from my visit to Harvard; I was able to learn the latest developments in mathematics.
    • After he had spent time in Harvard as Whitney's research assistant, he began studying more global geometry problems.

  75. Whitehead biography
    • He accepted a chair in philosophy at Harvard University in 1924, and he taught at Harvard until his retirement in 1937.
    • Many universities awarded him an honorary degree including Manchester, St Andrews, Wisconsin, Harvard, Yale and Montreal.

  76. Schwinger biography
    • However, when he had finished his war work he resigned his position at Purdue to take up a post at Harvard.
    • He worked at Harvard University from 1945 to 1972, first as an Associate Professor but being promoted to full Professor in 1947.
    • On the contrary he received many honours, some of which we have already mentioned above, including the first Einstein Prize (1951), the National Medal of Science (1964), honorary doctorates from Purdue University (1961) and Harvard University (1962), and the Nature of Light Award of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (1949).

  77. Bott biography
    • In 1959 Bott accepted a full professorship at Harvard University.
    • He remained there for the rest of his career, retiring from teaching in 1999 but becoming William Casper Graustein Research Professor at Harvard.
    • We mentioned Smale above, and the second was Daniel Quillen who wrote his thesis Formal Properties of Over-Determined Systems Of Linear Partial Differential Equations at Harvard.

  78. Lemaitre biography
    • Now, with the strong mathematical background obtained from his studies with de la Vallee Poussin, Lemaitre turned towards mathematical astronomy and went to Cambridge in England where he studied with Eddington during the academic years 1923-24, then he went to the United States spending the next academic year at the Harvard College Observatory in Massachusetts.
    • In 1925 he accepted a position as a part-time lecturer at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium but continued to spend time at Harvard and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States.
    • The research he had undertaken, partly at Harvard, partly at MIT and partly at Louvain, was written up as Un Univers homogene de masse constante et de rayon croissant rendant compte de la vitesse radiale des nebuleuses extragalactiques Ⓣ and published in the Annales de la Societe Scientifique de Bruxelles in 1927.

  79. Hille biography
    • Hille obtained a fellowship to work with Birkhoff in Harvard and he returned to the land of his birth in 1920, spending the academic year 1920-21 at Harvard where, as well as working with Birkhoff, he also studied with Kellogg.
    • In academic year 1921-22 Hille was Benjamin Peirce Instructor at Harvard then, in 1922, he went to Princeton as an instructor.

  80. Egorov biography
    • Anna was an excellent pianist and singer and her sister Natalya, who lived with Egorov and his wife for many years, was a professional pianist [',' L R Graham and J-M Kantor, Naming infinity: a true story of religious mysticism and mathematical creativity (Harvard University Press, 2009).','2]:- .
    • Egorov was highly critical of this action [',' L R Graham and J-M Kantor, Naming infinity: a true story of religious mysticism and mathematical creativity (Harvard University Press, 2009).','2]:- .
    • His position was greatly weakened, however, when his own students turned against him [',' L R Graham and J-M Kantor, Naming infinity: a true story of religious mysticism and mathematical creativity (Harvard University Press, 2009).','2]:- .

  81. Newcomb biography
    • While working there, he studied at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University, working under Benjamin Peirce, and graduated in 1858.
    • At this stage he divided his time between Harvard, where although not formally enrolled he began to undertake research, and the Almanac Office where he continued his computational work.
    • By now he had a very high reputation as an astronomer and, as a consequence, he was offered the post of Director of the Harvard College Observatory in 1875.

  82. Pairman biography
    • She hoped to continue graduate studies at Radcliffe College, a women's college associated with Harvard University, in Massachusetts and Cargill Knott wrote to the dean at Radcliffe:- .
    • In 1927 she published a joint mathematics paper On a class of integral equations with discontinuous kernels with Rudolph E Langer, who was a friend who graduated from Harvard in a June 1922 ceremony as Eleanor Pairman and Bancroft Brown and, like Eleanor, had George Birkhoff as his thesis advisor.
    • A graduate student at Harvard was blind and needed a particular book put into Braille, and it was full of mathematical symbols.

  83. Chung biography
    • Chung was one of the first to receive such a Fellowship and she went to Harvard:- .
    • In 1991, however, she became a visiting professor at the Mathematics Department at Harvard University.

  84. Wilson Edwin biography
    • Wilson attended Harvard University, graduating with a A.B.
    • In 1922 Wilson left the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to become Professor of Vital Statistics at the Harvard School of Public Health.

  85. Pitt biography
    • He held a Bye-Fellowship at Peterhouse from 1936 to 1939, but spent session 1937-38 at Harvard University where he was a Chaote Memorial Fellow.
    • It was therefore particularly beneficial for him to spend a year in Cambridge, Massachusetts, during which time he was able to collaborate with David Widder at Harvard and with Norbert Wiener at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  86. Book biography
    • He undertook research at Harvard University under the supervision of Sheila A Greibach and was awarded a Ph.D.
    • Book was appointed to Harvard and later he moved to Yale.

  87. Mandelbrot biography
    • As well as IBM Fellow at the Watson Research Center Mandelbrot was Professor of the Practice of Mathematics at Harvard University.
    • He also held appointments as Professor of Engineering at Yale, of Professor of Mathematics at the Ecole Polytechnique, of Professor of Economics at Harvard, and of Professor of Physiology at the Einstein College of Medicine.

  88. Olivier biography
    • In 1857, four years after Olivier died, Harvard University purchased 24 of Olivier's models from Fabre de Lagrange and after the university received the order Benjamin Peirce gave a series of lectures on the mathematics which they illustrated.
    • These models are still in Harvard's collection of scientific instruments.

  89. Bochner biography
    • With the assistance of Caratheodory, also a professor at Munich, Perron tried to obtain an invitation for Bochner to go to Harvard:- .
    • The attempt to obtain an invitation for Bochner to Harvard rather backfired, however, since the decision eventually fell to G D Birkhoff, who was visiting Europe.

  90. Whyburn William biography
    • Whyburn was still at the University of Texas when he submitted a further paper Existence and oscillation theorems for non-linear differential systems of the second order for publication on 7 September 1927 but, shortly after that, he went to Harvard where he spent the academic year 1927-28 as a National Research Fellow.
    • He retained his position at the Texas Technological College in Lubbock, taking leave from the College and, in 1927-28 while he was at Harvard he was still on the faculty at the Texas Technological College but on leave.

  91. Adams Edwin biography
    • He studied in Harvard, Berlin, Gottingen and Cambridge, England, obtaining his doctorate in 1904 from Harvard.

  92. Gould biography
    • Benjamin Gould had been born in Boston and had studied mathematics and astronomy at Harvard, taught by Benjamin Peirce.
    • In 1885 Benjamin Gould returned to Boston and, shortly after this Alice entered the Society for the Collegiate Instruction of Women (which later was named Radcliffe College) set up to provide education for women who were not allowed to study at Harvard University.

  93. Chernoff biography
    • However, Chernoff did not really retire since he was appointed as Professor of Statistics at Harvard University.
    • he became also Professor Emeritus of Statistics of Harvard University.

  94. Griffiths biography
    • In 1972 he left Princeton when he was appointed professor at Harvard University.
    • He was named Dwight Parker Robinson Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University in 1983 but in that year was named Provost and James B Duke Professor of Mathematics at Duke University.

  95. Uhlenbeck Karen biography
    • However at this time she married and decided to follow her husband when he went to Harvard.
    • She was awarded honorary doctorates by the University of Illinois, Champaign in 2000, by the University of Ohio in 2001, by the University of Michigan in 2004, and by Harvard University in 2007.

  96. Archibald biography
    • After graduating from Mount Allison, Archibald entered Harvard University in 1895.
    • from Harvard in 1896, remaining there to study for his Master's Degree which was awarded in 1897.

  97. Perrin-Riou biography
    • In the autumn of that year she accepted an invitation to spend a year as a visiting professor at Harvard University [',' C Morrow, Bernadette Perrin-Riou, in Charlene Morrow and Teri Perl (eds.), Notable Women in Mathematics: A Biographical Dictionary (Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut, London, 1998), 161-164.','2]:- .
    • Although she enjoyed the intellectual interchange at Harvard, she found that splitting her time between work and family was difficult.

  98. Tate biography
    • He graduated from Harvard University in 1946 and went to Princeton University, still with the intention of undertaking research in physics.
    • He spent the year 1953-54 as a visiting professor at Columbia University then, in 1954, he was appointed to Harvard University.

  99. Serre biography
    • In particular he spent time at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton (in 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1967, 1970, 1972, 1978, 1983, 1999) and at Harvard University (in 1957, 1964, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996).
    • He has been awarded honorary degrees from the University of Cambridge in 1978, the University of Stockholm in 1980, the University of Glasgow in 1983, the University of Athens in 1996, the University of Harvard in 1998, the University of Durham in 2000, the University of London in 2001, the University of Oslo in 2002, the University of Oxford in 2003, the University of Bucharest in 2004, the University of Barcelona in 2004, the University of Madrid in 2006 and the University of McGill in 2008.

  100. Feit biography
    • In 1951 Harvard University offered Brauer a chair and, in 1952, he took up the position in Harvard.

  101. Schiffer biography
    • In 1946 Schiffer moved to the United States when he was appointed as a Research Lecturer at Harvard University.
    • While he was a young faculty member at the Hebrew University, Schiffer began a collaboration with Stefan Bergman and they continued to collaborate through the years that they spent together at Harvard during the second half of the 1940s.

  102. Hodge biography
    • Hodge visited Harvard in 1950.
    • However, he spent the year from January 1950 at Harvard where Zariski had arranged for him to be a visiting lecturer.

  103. Frank biography
    • In the United States Frank was first appointed as a visiting lecturer, then made a lecturer in physics and mathematics at Harvard.
    • He was joined at Harvard by his friend von Mises.

  104. Brink biography
    • After a year at Harvard as a graduate student, he was appointed professor of English Literature at Kansas State University.
    • He then entered Harvard University where his thesis advisor was G D Birkhoff.

  105. Bergman biography
    • In 1945 he joined von Mises in Harvard.
    • His stay in Harvard lasted until 1952 when he moved to the Mathematics Department at Stanford University where he spent the rest of his career.

  106. Goldstein biography
    • The pressure put on him in his role as Vice President of Technion was unbearable, however, so, as a consequence, his stay in Israel was not very long and in 1955 he accepted the Gordon McKay Professorship of Applied Mathematics at Harvard in the United States.
    • Goldstein retired from his Harvard chair in 1970.

  107. Carleson biography
    • Carleson spent session 1950-51 in the United States, undertaking post-doctoral work at Harvard University.
    • There he was greatly influenced by A Zygmund and R Salem who were both at Harvard that year and, as we explain below, it was Zygmund's influence which set him on the path to proving his most famous result.

  108. Schoenberg biography
    • In 1932 the family left Chicago and went to Cambridge Massachusetts where he attended courses both at Harvard and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    • At Harvard he attended lectures by David Vernon Widder (1898-1990), and at M.I.T.

  109. Coates biography
    • Continuing to move round some of the leading centres for mathematical research, Coates obtained a position as assistant professor of mathematics at Harvard University in the United States in 1969.
    • From Harvard he moved to Stanford University in 1972, where he was an associate professor, and, after a further three years he returned to England to take up a lectureship at the University of Cambridge in 1975.

  110. Bowditch biography
    • He was offered the chair of mathematics and physics at Harvard in 1806 but he turned it down.
    • Harvard University was not the only one to offer Bowditch a chair.

  111. Askey biography
    • Already attracted towards analysis by the strong analysis school at Washington University, he then went to Harvard University to study for his Master's degree and in 1956 he received his M.A.
    • After graduating from Harvard, Askey moved to Princeton University to study for his doctorate.

  112. Witten biography
    • After completing his doctorate, Witten went to Harvard where he was postdoctoral fellow during session 1976-77 and then a Junior Fellow from 1977 to 1980.
    • He has been awarded honorary degrees from Brandeis University (1988), the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1993), Columbia University, New York (1996), the University of Southern California (2004), Johns Hopkins University (2005), and Harvard University (2005).

  113. Bernays biography
    • He wrote (see [',' C Parsons, Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century (Harvard University Press, 2014).','4]):- .
    • Let us now quote some of Charles Parsons' concluding remarks about Bernays' achievements [',' C Parsons, Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century (Harvard University Press, 2014).','4]:- .

  114. Yau biography
    • In 1988 he was appointed professor at Harvard University.
    • He put a great deal of effort into building Chinese mathematics, visiting China during the Harvard summer vacation, helping top Chinese students go to the United States for doctoral studies, and working hard for the founding of mathematical institutes in Hong Kong, Beijing and Hangzhou.

  115. Ladd-Franklin biography
    • For two years she attended Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts where she followed the same course as the boys who were being prepared to enter Harvard University.
    • This she did at Columbia University from 1912-1913, then at Clark University and Harvard University in 1913, finally teaching at the University of Chicago in 1914.

  116. Schwartz biography
    • Harald Bohr presented a Fields Medal to Schwartz at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Harvard on 30 August 1950 for his work on the theory of distributions.
    • Harald Bohr [',' H Bohr, The work of L Schwartz, Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians, Harvard, 1950 (American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 1952).','7] described Schwartz's 1948 paper as one:- .

  117. Fuller biography
    • Twice expelled from Harvard University, business disasters with the construction company in which he was a minority stockholder, and the death of his four year old daughter, brought him close to suicide.
    • He was appointed as Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University in 1962.

  118. Rota biography
    • After spending the year 1956-57 in New York, Rota was appointed as Benjamin Peirce Instructor at Harvard University.
    • I remember travelling to his apartment in Harvard square to talk about my work even when he wasn't going to be at MIT.

  119. Geiringer biography
    • During the week she taught at the College, travelling to Cambridge every weekend to be with von Mises who worked at Harvard at this time.
    • In 1953 von Mises died and the following year Geiringer, although retaining her job at Wheaton College, began to work at Harvard on editing von Mises' works.

  120. Tucker Albert biography
    • DeLury still pressed him to go to Europe to do graduate work or, failing that, to go to Chicago or Harvard.
    • In December 1932 he went to Harvard, where he worked with Morse, leaving in June 1933 to spend the summer at the University of Chicago.

  121. Orszag biography
    • [The course] was so popular that a lot of students from Harvard came to take it as well.
    • A course that good really wasn't offered at Harvard.

  122. Caratheodory biography
    • He sailed to the United States with his wife in January and after a lecture tour and time spent as a visiting professor at Harvard, returned to Munich in September.
    • In 1936-37 he made another visit to the United States, giving a lecture at the American Mathematical Society meeting to commemorate the tercentenary of Harvard University on 31 August 1936, then spending the winter semester at the University of Wisconsin as Carl Schurz Memorial Professor.

  123. Kontsevich biography
    • This remarkable achievement led to Kontsevich receiving invitations to Harvard University, Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, and the University of Bonn.

  124. McShane biography
    • McShane spent part of the following two years at Princeton, part at Ohio State, part at Harvard and part at Chicago.

  125. Wright Sewall biography
    • Ernest William Castle visited the University of Illinois in Wright's final year and after, interviewing Wright, offered him an assistantship at Harvard's Bussey Institution.

  126. Henrici Peter biography
    • In addition, throughout his career, he held a number of visiting professorships at Harvard, Stanford and several other universities in the United States.

  127. Vidav biography
    • For instance, he participated at the 11th International Congress of Mathematicians at Harvard University in Cambridge, USA, from 30 August to 6 September in 1950, where he gave a short report on his own results on Fuchsian equations with five or six singularities.

  128. Sinai biography
    • Sinai has also been invited to give many prestigious lectures or lecture courses including: Loeb Lecturer, Harvard University (1978); Plenary Speaker at the International Congress on Mathematical Physics in Berlin (1981); Plenary Speaker at the International Congress on Mathematical Physics in Marseilles (1986); Distinguished Lecturer, Israel (1989); Solomon Lefschetz Lectures, Mexico (1990); Plenary Speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians, Kyoto (1990); Landau Lectures, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1993); Plenary Speaker at the First Latin American Congress in Mathematics (2000); Plenary Speaker at the American Mathematical Society Meeting "Challenges in Mathematics" (2000); Andreevski Lectures, Berlin, Germany (2001); Bowen Lectures, University of California at Berkeley (2001); Leonidas Alaoglu Memorial Lecture, California Institute of Technology (2002); Joseph Fels Ritt Lectures, Columbia University (2004); Leonardo da Vinci Lecture, Milan, Italy (2006); Galileo Chair, Pisa, Italy (2006); John T Lewis Lecture Series, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies and the Hamilton Mathematics Institute, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland (2007); and Milton Brockett Porter Lecture Series, Rice University, Houston, Texas (2007).

  129. Dyson biography
    • Esther went to Harvard at the age 16, where she majored in economics.

  130. Yano biography
    • Not only was he able to attend the International Congress of Mathematicians in Harvard in 1950 but he was also able to publish papers on curvature and Betti numbers.

  131. Cochran biography
    • From 1957 until he retired in 1976 Cochran was at Harvard.

  132. Knuth biography
    • He has received honorary degrees from a large number of universities world-wide: Waterloo University, Canada (2000), Tubingen University (2001), the University of Oslo (2002), Antwerp University (2003), Harvard University (2003), the University of Macedonia (2003), Montreal University (2004), ETH Zurich (2005), Concordia University (2006), Wisconsin University (2006), the University of Bordeau (2007).

  133. Cartan biography
    • He received honorary degrees from the University of Liege in 1934, and from Harvard University in 1936.

  134. Lions Jacques-Louis biography
    • Schwartz had received the medal at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Harvard on 30 August 1950 for his work on the theory of distributions.

  135. Rado biography
    • The following year saw Rado visit the United States where he was a visiting lecturer at Harvard University and Rice University.

  136. Chern biography
    • He was particularly inspired by a geometry course given by Lifu Jiang, the only professor of mathematics at the university, who had studied at Harvard under Julian Coolidge.

  137. Weil biography
    • Weil was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 1950 at Harvard when he gave an address on Number Theory and Algebraic Geometry and again at the following International Congress in 1954 in Amsterdam when he gave the lecture Abstract versus Classical Algebraic Geometry.

  138. Ursell biography
    • A visit to the United States in 1951 was important, for at this time he made contact with, among other, Richard Courant and Kurt Friedrichs in New York, and Garrett Birkhoff at Harvard.

  139. Sampson biography
    • Sampson used a series of accurate observations from Harvard College Observatory to amend the existing theory of the satellite orbits, but the disagreement between theory and observation persisted.

  140. Schouten biography
    • He said [',' A B Powell and M Frankenstein, In His Prime: Dirk Jan Struik Reflects on 103 Years of Mathematical and Politic Activities, Harvard Educational Review 69 (4) (1999).','7]:- .

  141. Carver biography
    • In [',' S M Stigler, Statistics on the Table: The History of Statistical Concepts and Methods (Harvard University Press, 2002).','2] Stephen Stigler explains in detail what happened to Annals of Mathematical Statistics in 1933.

  142. Vranceanu biography
    • In Paris he worked with Elie Cartan and then he went to the United States where he studied at Harvard University and Princeton University.

  143. Elfving biography
    • In 1945 Lars Ahlfors went to the University of Zurich and, after a year there, went to Harvard in the United States.

  144. Stiefel biography
    • Rutishauser and Speiser spent most of 1949 at Harvard with Howard Aiken and at Princeton with John von Neumann, but they also visited a number of other computer installations, including the ENIAC at Aberdeen, Maryland and the MARK II at Dahlgren.

  145. Eells biography
    • He applied for graduate study at Harvard and there began research under Hassler Whitney.

  146. Malgrange biography
    • In his second year of study he was taught by Henri Cartan who had arrived back from a visit to Chicago and Harvard in the United States.

  147. Wien biography
    • In spring 1913 he visited the United States, lecturing at Columbia University and also visiting Harvard and Yale.

  148. Williams biography
    • Her mother was a painter while her father was a mathematician who had graduated from Harvard and taught mathematics and Greek at a private boys school.

  149. Harish-Chandra biography
    • He spent 1949-50 at Harvard where he was influenced by Zariski.

  150. Ferrel biography
    • However he was now close to Harvard University and he made use of its library and discussed his ideas with the mathematicians there such as Benjamin Peirce, Simon Newcomb, Asaph Hall, and J D Runkle who was the editor of the American Mathematical Monthly in which Ferrel published a number of important articles.

  151. Kurepa biography
    • There he visited Harvard University, the University of Chicago, the University of California at Berkeley and at Los Angeles, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

  152. Mori biography
    • He was visiting professor at Harvard during 1977-1980, the Institute for Advanced Study in 1981-82, Columbia University 1985-87 and the University of Utah for periods during 1987-89 and again during 1991-92.

  153. Segre Beniamino biography
    • a lecture by Severi in Harvard ..

  154. Faltings biography
    • Following the award of his doctorate, Faltings went to the United States where he spent a year doing postdoctoral work as a research fellow at Harvard University in 1978-79.

  155. Jones Burton biography
    • In 1942 Jones left the University of Texas to undertake War work at Harvard Underwater Sound Laboratory where he helped develop scanning sonar used in anti-submarine warfare.

  156. Schoen biography
    • In addition to the visiting positions which we mentioned above, Schoen was a Visiting Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, in the Spring of 1984, a Visiting Professor at the Courant Institute, New York University in academic year 1989-90, Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, in academic year 1992-93, and a Visiting Professor at Harvard University in the autumn of 1999.

  157. Cohen biography
    • In 1966 Cohen published the monograph Set theory and the continuum hypothesis based on a course he gave at Harvard in spring 1965.

  158. Pierpont biography
    • One of the early members, also named James Pierpont (1659-1714), was a graduate of Harvard University and a founder of The Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701 which shortly after was named Yale College.

  159. Gini biography
    • Other honours he had received before the outbreak of World War II include honorary degrees from the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (1932), the University of Geneva (1934), and Harvard University (1936).

  160. Jeffery Ralph biography
    • He continued his studies during a year at Harvard and then, in 1924, he was appointed Head of Mathematics at Acadia University.

  161. Hendricks biography
    • In 1899 the Annals of Mathematics was transferred to Harvard University, and in 1911 to Princeton University.

  162. Merrill biography
    • After working at Harvard, in 1884 Merrill applied, to Columbia University, in New York, to be allowed to study mathematics and astronomy.

  163. Bernstein Felix biography
    • In 1928 Bernstein spent time at Harvard in the United States as a visiting professor.

  164. Sullivan biography
    • from Harvard, he was really Sullivan's student, and it was while visiting the IHES that McMullen got the idea for his thesis problem.

  165. Cheney biography
    • Ambikeshwar Sharma (1920-2003) held positions at Cornell, Rajasthan, Harvard, and the University of California at Los Angeles before joining the University of Alberta in 1962.

  166. Schutzenberger biography
    • He remained on the staff at Poitiers until 1963 but spent the year 1961-62 as a Lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University.

  167. Suzuki Michio biography
    • After spending academic year 1956-57 at Harvard University, Suzuki returned to the University of Illinois where he was promoted to associate professor in 1958 and full professor in 1959.

  168. De Rham biography
    • He visited Harvard in 1949-50 and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton in 1950.

  169. Menger biography
    • He visited Harvard University and the Rice Institute in Houston, Texas.

  170. Vallee Poussin biography
    • During the First World War he was invited to Harvard in 1915 and then to Paris in 1916.

  171. Gale biography
    • In fact Alvin Roth, professor of economics at Harvard University, had nominated Gale for the Nobel Prize in economics.

  172. Schroder biography
    • It is interesting to note that in June 1913 Norbert Wiener presented his doctoral thesis to Harvard University; Wiener was then 18 years old.

  173. Lang biography
    • First we mention the case of the Harvard political scientist Samuel P Huntington.

  174. Seidenberg biography
    • His career included a Guggenheim Fellowship [awarded 1953], visiting Professorships at Harvard and at the University of Milan, and numerous invited addresses, including several series of lectures at the University of Milan, the National University of Mexico, and at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome.

  175. Selberg biography
    • In 1950 Selberg was awarded a Fields Medal at the International Congress of Mathematicians at Harvard.

  176. Wiles biography
    • From 1977 until 1980 Wiles was a Junior Research fellow at Clare College, Cambridge and also a Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University.

  177. Segal biography
    • Segal was appointed as an Instructor of Mathematics at Harvard University in 1941 but when the United States entered World War II he undertook war work, first at Princeton from 1941 to 1943 and then ballistics research at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland from 1943 to 1945.

  178. Kodaira biography
    • After spending a year as a visiting professor at Harvard from September 1961 following Oscar Zariski's invitation, in September 1962 he was appointed to the chair of mathematics at Johns Hopkins University.

  179. Cartan Henri biography
    • He was invited by Andre Weil to visit Chicago in January 1948, and he received an invitation to visit Harvard University for four months, February to May 1948.

  180. Gruenberg biography
    • He was awarded a Commonwealth Fund Fellowship which enabled him to spend 1955-56 at Harvard then 1956-57 at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton [',' J Roseblade, Karl Gruenberg, The Guardian (12 December, 2007).','2]:- .

  181. Ribenboim biography
    • In 1966 Ribenboim spent two months at Harvard working with Zariski.

  182. Berge biography
    • He has participated in colloquia at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has lectured at a number of institutions in the United States, including Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley.

  183. Bell biography
    • In the summer 1925 he lectured at the University of Chicago on his research while in the autumn he lectured at Harvard.

  184. Bezout biography
    • In particular Harvard University adopted them as calculus textbooks.

  185. Mises biography
    • He became professor at Harvard University and in 1944 he was appointed Gordon-McKay Professor of Aerodynamics and Applied Mathematics there.

  186. Church biography
    • Church spent two years as a National Research Fellow, one year at Harvard University then a year at Gottingen and Amsterdam.

  187. Backus biography
    • from Harvard, were married on 18 July 1968 in San Francisco County, California.

  188. Atiyah biography
    • Many universities have awarded him an honorary degree including: Bonn (1968), Warwick (1969), Durham (1979), St Andrews (1981), Trinity College Dublin (1983), Chicago (1983), Edinburgh (1984), Cambridge (1984), Essex (1985), London (1985), Sussex (1986), Ghent (1987), Reading (1990), Helsinki (1990), Leicester (1991), Rutgers (1992), Salamanca (1992), Montreal (1993), Waterloo (1993), Wales (1993), Queen's-Kingston (1994), Keele (1994), Birmingham (1994), Open University (1995), Manchester (1996), Chinese University of Hong Kong (1996), Brown University (1997), Oxford (1998), University of Wales Swansea (1998), Charles University Prague (1998), Heriot-Watt University (1999), University of Mexico (2001), American University of Beirut (2004), York (2005), Harvard University (2006), Scuola Normale Pisa (2007), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (2008).

  189. Motzkin biography
    • Motzkin emigrated to the United States in 1948 and there he spent two years at Harvard and Boston College.

  190. Bremermann biography
    • He travelled to the United States in 1952 where he held a research associate position at Stanford University and then, in 1953, he was appointed a research fellow at Harvard University.

  191. Cooper William biography
    • These include an honorary doctorate from Ohio State University (1970), honorary master of arts from Harvard University (1976), honorary doctorate from Carnegie-Mellon University (1982), the establishment by Carnegie-Mellon University of the William W Cooper Professorship (1982), joint recipient of the John von Neumann Theory Prize awarded jointly by The Institute of Management Sciences and Operations Research Society of America (1982), Award for Outstanding Research Contributions from the Graduate School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin (1984 and 1987), Professional Achievement Citation of the University of Chicago Alumni Association (1986), establishment by The University of Texas of William W Cooper Fellowships (1988), establishment by Carnegie Mellon University of William W Cooper Fellowships (1989), Carnegie Mellon University Graduate School of Industrial Administration names their Auditorium in honour of William W Cooper (1989), elected to Hall of Fame, Graduate School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin (1990), elected to Accounting Hall of Fame (1995), honorary doctorate from the University of Alicante, Spain (1995), elected to the Hall of Fame of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies (2006), and received The University of Texas Presidential Award (2009).

  192. Wintner biography
    • He spent the year 1937-38 at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, also visiting Harvard during that period to work with G D Birkhoff.

  193. Steele biography
    • She was based at the University of Illinois for two years and then for a year at Harvard where she lived in Edmund's Hall.

  194. Divinsky biography
    • Adrian Albert was Acting Chairman of the Mathematics Department in the summer of 1946 before Marshall Stone came from Harvard to take on the role of Chairman.

  195. Fisher biography
    • Various institutions awarded him an honorary degree including Harvard University (1936), University of Calcutta (1938), University of London (1946), University of Glasgow (1947), University of Adelaide (1959), University of Leeds (1961), and the Indian Statistical Institute (1962).

  196. Veblen biography
    • After a year spent as a laboratory assistant at the University of Iowa, Veblen spent a year at Harvard University where he was awarded a second B.A.

  197. Thompson John biography
    • Thompson was an assistant at Harvard University in 1961-62, then, in 1962, he was appointed professor at the University of Chicago.

  198. Gelfand biography
    • In 1989-90 Gelfand taught at Harvard University and in 1990 he also taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  199. Courant biography
    • In 1940-41 he worked on a new book with Herbert Robbins, a young topologist from Harvard.

  200. McAfee biography
    • As part of this Fellowship he worked at Harvard for a year.

  201. Jacobson biography
    • Having applied to Princeton, Harvard and Chicago for financial support to undertake graduate studies, he went to Princeton where he was awarded a research assistantship to study for his doctorate under Wedderburn's supervision.

  202. Cauer biography
    • An invitation from Oswald Veblen to visit Harvard gave him the chance to meet Eberhard Hopf and David Tamarkin.

  203. Douglas biography
    • Then he was awarded a National Research Fellowship and, from 1926 to 1930, he visited Princeton (1926-27), Harvard (1927), Chicago (1928), Paris (1928-30), and Gottingen (1930).

  204. Black Fischer biography
    • In 1964, he earned a PhD from Harvard University in applied mathematics.

  205. Rutishauser biography
    • Rutishauser and Speiser spent most of 1949 at Harvard with Howard Aiken and at Princeton with John von Neumann.

  206. Szmielew biography
    • Tarski, by good fortune, had travelled to Harvard University in the United States to attend a meeting and was there when war broke out.

  207. Speiser biography
    • Rutishauser and Speiser spent most of 1949 at Harvard with Howard Aiken and at Princeton with John von Neumann.

  208. Finkel biography
    • [In particular, it contains a syllabus for mathematics at Harvard in session 1899-1900.] .

  209. Weinstein biography
    • He was also a member of Birkhoff's research group at Harvard doing war work.

  210. Spitzer biography
    • He then was appointed as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, spending the academic year 1938-39 there before returning to Yale where he was appointed as an Instructor in 1939.

  211. Alling biography
    • Awarded a National Sciences Foundation postdoctoral fellowship, he spent the year 1961-62 at Harvard University, being promoted to associate professor at Purdue in 1962.

  212. Zarankiewicz biography
    • Also in 1948 he went to the United States for several months and taught at a number of universities including Harvard.

  213. Pascal Ernesto biography
    • James K Whittemore, of Harvard University, reviewing the German translation, writes:- .

  214. Margulis biography
    • Between 1988 and 1991 Margulis made a number of visits to the Max Planck Institute in Bonn, to the Institut des Hautes Etudes and to the College de France, to Harvard and to the Institute for Advanced study in Princeton.

  215. Mei Juecheng biography
    • Benjamin Elman writes [','B A Elman, On Their Own Terms: Science In China, 1550-1900 (Harvard University Press, 2005).','2]:- .

  216. Box biography
    • He continued on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin, spending the academic year 1965-66 as a visiting professor at the Harvard Business School and he was visiting professor at the University of Essex in England during 1970-71.

  217. Petryshyn biography
    • Finally we should mention the Vasyl and Maria Petryshyn Memorial Lectures in Ukrainian Studies established at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute in 1991 through a major gift donated by the estate of the late Vasyl and Maria Petryshyn, with additional funds provided by their son Volodymyr Petryshyn, and other family members.

  218. Levi-Civita biography
    • In 1936 he returned to the United States, lecturing at Harvard, Princeton and the Rice Institute.

  219. Sylvester biography
    • After two unsuccessful bids for posts at Columbia College and Harvard, he boarded a ship back to England on 20 November 1843.

  220. Conway Arthur biography
    • He was preparing to leave Dublin to go to the International Congress of Mathematicians in Harvard when he died suddenly.

  221. Lorenz Edward biography
    • He graduated from Dartmouth College with a bachelor's degree in 1938, then went to Harvard where he studied for a Master's Degree in mathematics.

  222. Zariski biography
    • After spending the year 1946-47 at the University of Illinois, Zariski was appointed to a chair at Harvard where he was to remain until he retired in 1969.


History Topics

  1. Chinese overview
    • Chinese students began to study mathematics abroad and in 1917 Minfu Tah Hu obtained a doctorate from Harvard.

  2. Bolzano's manuscripts references
    • A Coffa, Kant, Bolzano and the emergence of logicism, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  3. Doubling the cube references
    • M R Cohen and I E Drabkin (trs.), A source book in Greek science (Harvard, 1948).

  4. Real numbers 2 references
    • P M Simons, Frege's theory of real numbers, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  5. Real numbers 3 references
    • P M Simons, Frege's theory of real numbers, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  6. Weather forecasting references
    • S Auyang, Nonlinear Dynamics: How Science Comprehends Chaos (talk given at Harvard University, 23.02.1998) [http://www.creatingtechnology.org/papers/chaos.htm] .

  7. Bolzano's manuscripts references
    • A Coffa, Kant, Bolzano and the emergence of logicism, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  8. Doubling the cube references
    • M R Cohen and I E Drabkin (trs.), A source book in Greek science (Harvard, 1948).

  9. Real numbers 2 references
    • P M Simons, Frege's theory of real numbers, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  10. Real numbers 3 references
    • P M Simons, Frege's theory of real numbers, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  11. Neptune and Pluto
    • He moved to the Harvard College Observatory and, in 1919, he also predicted a position of a trans-Neptunian planet using the discrepancies in both the orbits of Uranus and Neptune as data.

  12. Doubling the cube
    • This purports to be a letter written by Eratosthenes to King Ptolemy and, although the letter is a forgery, the writer does quote some genuine writings of Eratosthenes [',' M R Cohen and I E Drabkin (trs.), A source book in Greek science (Harvard, 1948).','1]:- .

  13. Weather forecasting references
    • S Auyang, Nonlinear Dynamics: How Science Comprehends Chaos (talk given at Harvard University, 23.02.1998) [http://www.creatingtechnology.org/papers/chaos.htm] .


Societies etc

  1. American Academy of Arts and Sciences
    • The American Academy of Arts and Sciences was established in 1779 by a group of Harvard College graduates.


Honours

  1. MAA Hedrick Lecturer
    • 1954 Lynn H Loomis, Harvard University .
    • 1962 Andrew M Gleason, Harvard University .
    • 1985 Arthur M Jaffe, Harvard University .
    • 1989 Persi Diaconis, Harvard University .


References

  1. References for Aiken
    • H Brooks et al., Speeches delivered at the memorial ceremony for Howard Hathaway Aiken (Harvard University Press, New Haven, 1973).
    • I B Cohen, Babbage and Aiken: with notes on Henry Babbage's gift to Harvard, and to other institutions, of a portion of his father's difference engine, Annals of the history of computing 10 (1988), 171-193.
    • Howard Hathaway Aiken, Harvard University Gazette 69 (37) (1974).
    • Howard H Aiken, Built Computer; Developer of the Mark I Dies - Was Harvard Professor Taught Until 1961 Human Factors Cited, New York Times (March 16, 1973).
    • Howard Aiken and the Harvard Mark I, I Programmer.

  2. References for Hiebert
    • Erwin N Hiebert, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University (2013).
    • http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~hsdept/bios/hiebert.html .
    • Professor of the history of science taught at Harvard since 1970, Harvard Gazette (23 January 2013).
    • The Harvard Years, in Mary Jo Nye, Joan L Richards and Roger H Stuewer (eds.), The Invention of Physical Science (Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht-Boston-London, 1992), xix-xxiv.

  3. References for Peirce B O
    • B O Peirce, Mathematical and Physical Papers, 1903-1913 (Harvard, 1926).
    • Early history of the Department, Department of Physics, Harvard University.
    • https://www.physics.harvard.edu/about/history .
    • J Trowbridge, Benjamin Osgood Peirce, Harvard Graduates' Magazine 22 (March, 1914), 417-419.

  4. References for McMullen
    • A-M Oreskovich and D Sagalovskiy, Harvard University Math Club Interview with Professor Curtis McMullen (Harvard University, 1999).
    • http://www.math.harvard.edu/~ctm/expositions/interview.html .

  5. References for Valiant
    • J Fishman, 'Probably Approximately Correct' Inventor, From Harvard University, Wins Turing Award, Chronicle of Higher Education (9 March, 2011).
    • C Hennick, Professor gets computing's 'Nobel' : Harvard's Leslie Valiant wins A M Turing Award, Boston Globe (9 March 2011).
    • V Reitano, Harvard's Valiant wins Turing Award, SDTimes (9 March 2011).

  6. References for Mosteller
    • A Powell, Founder of Harvard's Statistics Department, Frederick Mosteller, dies : Work influential in public health, education, Harvard University Gazette (25 July 2006).

  7. References for Fuchs Klaus
    • R Chadwell Williams, Klaus Fuchs : Atom Spy (Harvard University Press, 1987).

  8. References for Wheeler
    • L S Grinstein, Anna Johnson Pell Wheeler, Notable American Women, The Modern Period, A Biographical Dictionary (The Belknap Press, Harvard University Press, 1980), 725-726.

  9. References for Gassendi
    • L S Joy, Gassendi the atomist : advocate of history in an age of science (Harvard University, Cambridge, 1987).

  10. References for Jordan Pascual
    • R Beyler, From Positivism to Organism: Pascual Jordan's Interpretations of Modern Physics in Cultural Context (PhD thesis, Harvard University,1994).

  11. References for Scott
    • M Lehr, Charlotte Angas Scott, Notable American Women, 1607-1950 3 (Belknap Press, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., 1971), 249-250.

  12. References for Babbage
    • I B Cohen, Babbage and Aiken : with notes on Henry Babbage's gift to Harvard, and to other institutions, of a portion of his father's difference engine, Ann.

  13. References for Carver
    • S M Stigler, Statistics on the Table: The History of Statistical Concepts and Methods (Harvard University Press, 2002).

  14. References for Bolzano
    • A Coffa, Kant, Bolzano and the emergence of logicism, in Frege's philosophy of mathematics (Harvard Univ.

  15. References for Hypatia
    • M Dzielska, Hypatia of Alexandria (Harvard, 1995).

  16. References for Schouten
    • A B Powell and M Frankenstein, In His Prime: Dirk Jan Struik Reflects on 103 Years of Mathematical and Politic Activities, Harvard Educational Review 69 (4) (1999).

  17. References for Russell
    • in B Russell, Logic and Knowledge (London, Allen and Unwin, 1956), 59-102, and in J van Heijenoort, From Frege to Godel (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1967), 152-182.

  18. References for Beurling
    • S Nardis, A History in Sum (Harvard University Press, 2013).

  19. References for Sylow
    • A R Alexander, Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern Mathematics (Harvard University Press, 2010).

  20. References for Mei Juecheng
    • B A Elman, On Their Own Terms: Science In China, 1550-1900 (Harvard University Press, 2005).

  21. References for Knorr
    • Wilbur Richard Knorr, Harvard University Department of the History of Science Newsletter (2) (Fall, 1997), 5.

  22. References for Schwinger
    • Winding up at the radiation lab, going to Harvard, and marriage, Found.

  23. References for Cusa
    • P E Sigmund, Nicholas of Cusa and Medieval Political Thought (Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass., 1963).

  24. References for Mackey
    • Mackey, 90 : Obituary, Harvard News (Cambridge, March 2006.

  25. References for Egorov
    • L R Graham and J-M Kantor, Naming infinity: a true story of religious mysticism and mathematical creativity (Harvard University Press, 2009).

  26. References for Bernays
    • C Parsons, Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century (Harvard University Press, 2014).

  27. References for Leslie
    • Sir John Leslie : 1766-1832, A study of the Pursuit of the Exact Sciences in the Scottish Enlightenment (Harvard, 1967).

  28. References for Schwartz
    • H Bohr, The work of L Schwartz, Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians, Harvard, 1950 (American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 1952).

  29. References for De Forest
    • S M Stigler, The history of statistics : The measurement of uncertainty before 1900 (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1986).

  30. References for Coolidge
    • M Hammond et al., Julian Lowell Coolidge, Harvard University Gazette (26 February 1955), 136-138.

  31. References for Eddington
    • Thesis, Harvard University, 1991).

  32. References for Campanus
    • E Grant, A Source Book in Medieval Science (Harvard University Press, 1974).

  33. References for Mises
    • G Birkhoff, Richard von Mises' years at Harvard, Z.

  34. References for Gleason
    • D B Ruder, Symposium to Celebrate Gleason, Society of Fellows (Harvard Gazette Archives, 9 May 1996).

  35. References for Rallis
    • Stephen James Rallis, Harvard-Radcliffe Class of 1964.

  36. References for Stringham
    • J F Tyler and L Swift, Irving Stringham, Harvard College Class of 1877 Seventh Report On the Occasion of the fortieth Anniversary of Graduation June 1917 (Plimpton Press, Norwood, Massachusetts, 1917), 253- 258.

  37. References for Peirce Charles
    • M Murphey, The Development of Peirce's Philosophy (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1961).

  38. References for Saccheri
    • A F Emch, The 'Logica demonstrativa' of Girolamo Saccheri (Harvard, 1933).

  39. References for Mazur Barry
    • A Powell, Mazur Named University Professor, Harvard University Gazette (29 October, 1998).


Additional material

  1. Hiebert's doctoral students
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 1972.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 1973.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 1974.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 1975.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, 1983.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University, 1986.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University , 1990.
    • University: Harvard University.
    • Thesis Published: Harvard University , 1991.
    • University: Harvard University.

  2. William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition
    • In 1921 William Lowell Putnam printed an article in the December issue of the Harvard Graduates Magazine.
    • So who was William Lowell Putnam? He had been born on 22 November 1861 and studied mathematics at Harvard being a member of the class of 1882.
    • Elizabeth was the sister of Percival Lowell, the astronomer who founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Abbott Lawrence Lowell, who became President of Harvard, and Amy Lowell, who became a famous poet.
    • His wife Elizabeth and her brother Abbott Lawrence Lowell, at that time President of Harvard, both shared Putnam's ideas about education and Elizabeth Putnam made provision in her will to created a trust fund known as the William Lowell Putnam Intercollegiate Memorial Fund.
    • The first was in 1928 when Harvard and Yale competed in an English Competition.
    • This first contest was won by Harvard but attempts to encourage Yale and Princeton to take part in a second contest met with refusals.
    • The next competition was in fact a mathematics competition in 1933 between Harvard and West Point Juniors.
    • Again the winners were enthusiastic to continue the series and again the losers (this time Harvard) declined the challenge.
    • Abbott Lawrence Lowell retired as President of Harvard in 1933 and, as we noted above, Elizabeth Putnam died two years later.
    • The two trustees approached their friend, the Harvard mathematician George David Birkhoff.
    • A graduate fellowship for Harvard would be offered to one of the top five competitors.
    • As Harvard set the paper, no team from Harvard was allowed to compete.
    • Irving Kaplansky was chosen for the Harvard fellowship - clearly a superb choice.
    • The 1946 competition was administered by Harvard (actually by Garrett Birkhoff) and the competition was held on 1 June.

  3. Survey of Modern Algebra
    • He returned to Harvard in 1938, the year after I had given a course in modern algebra on the undergraduate level for the first time.
    • I had taught algebra courses at Harvard when I was an instructor, and at Cornell I taught algebra out of the book by Bocher; at Chicago, out of a book, 'Modern Higher Algebra' by Albert; and at Harvard again out of my own notes.
    • We had tried out our somewhat differing ideas of how this should be done in a course at Harvard for three successive years, before reorganizing and presenting them in textbook form.
    • Also, the mathematics department at Harvard both emphasized research and expected all faculty members to be steadily active in teaching undergraduates.
    • He spent most of his career as a professor of mathematics at Harvard University.
    • During the 1930s, Birkhoff, along with his Harvard colleagues Marshall Stone and Saunders Mac Lane, substantially advanced American teaching and research in abstract algebra.

  4. G H Hardy's schedule of lectures in the USA
    • Delivered in absence due to ill health by H W Brinkmann, Harvard .
    • Harvard Tercentenary Conference of Arts and Sciences .
    • Harvard Mathematical Colloquium, 3 December, 1936 .
    • Caratheodory was visiting Harvard from Munich for the first part of .
    • Harvard University, until c.
    • Harvard University, 29 April -3 May, 1929 .

  5. Computer manual
    • The first computer manual was published in 1946: A Manual of Operation for the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator (Harvard University Press, 1946).
    • This had been produced by Howard Aiken at Harvard University.
    • In the summer of 1944, at a dedication ceremony at Harvard's Cruft Laboratory, one of the world's first automatic digital calculating machines was unveiled to the public.
    • The machine was the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator, more commonly known as the Harvard Mark I.
    • The staff of the Harvard Computation Laboratory was unprepared for the interest which news of the machine's dedication touched off, and in response to many inquiries they arranged for the publication of this Manual of Operation.

  6. Finkel's Solution Book
    • This reaction, it may be said, started as early as 1832, the time when Benjamin Peirce, the first American worthy to be ranked with Legendre, Wallis, Abel and the Bernouillis, became professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Harvard University.
    • Since that time the mathematical courses in our leading Universities have been enlarged and strengthened until now the opportunity for research work in mathematics as offered, for example, at the University of Chicago, Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Johns Hopkins, Princeton, Columbia and others, is as good as is to be found anywhere in the world.
    • For example, the following are the subjects offered at Harvard for the Academic year 1899-1900: Logarithms, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry; Plane Analytical Geometry; Plane and Solid Analytical Geometry; Algebra; Theory of Equations.

  7. Atiyah reviews
    • These notes are based on the course of lectures I gave at Harvard in the fall of 1964.
    • Based on Atiyah's Harvard course of 1964 this is the first rather comprehensive account of K-theory.
    • They also cover material presented in the spring of 1978 in the Loeb Lectures at Harvard and the Whittemore Lectures at Yale.

  8. Zariski and Samuel: 'Commutative Algebra
    • Professor of Mathematics, Harvard University .
    • Thanks are also due to the Harvard Foundation for Advanced Research whose grant to the senior author was used for typing part of the manuscript.
    • The work on Appendix 5 was supported by a Research project at Harvard University sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. M B˘cher: 'Integral equations
    • Professor of Mathematics in Harvard University .
    • HARVARD UNIVERSITY, .

  10. Hopper Aiken
    • I was ordered to the Navy Liaison Officer at Harvard.
    • I left Midshipmen School on Friday, and on Monday morning, 2nd July 1944, I reported to the Navy Liaison Officer, Harvard.

  11. Lehrer Songs
    • He trained as a mathematician, receiving his AB from Harvard in 1946 and being awarded a Master's degree in the following year.
    • He then undertook mathematics research at Harvard but, at the same time, began to develop his musical career and also took some time out to work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

  12. Diaconis laureation
    • He therefore applied to a number of mathematics departments and just one which offered statistics; nonetheless he ended up studying statistics because he 'wanted to go to Harvard'.
    • In an interview in 1984, when asked 'What does the future hold for Persi Diaconis?' he responded, 'Just going crazy, working hard, learning more math.' And that is how it went: appointments in Stanford and Harvard (currently a Joint Professorship in Statistics and Mathematics at Stanford), over 200 publications, around 40 doctoral students, tens of collaborators, always travelling, and always learning and sharing more mathematics.

  13. American Mathematical Society Colloquium
    • (a) Professor MAXIME BOCHER, of Harvard University .
    • (a) Professor WILLIAM F OSGOOD, of Harvard University: .

  14. Early Maths in America
    • In 1899 the Annals passed into the editorial control of the Mathematical Department of Harvard University.
    • A colloquium was held in the summer of 1898 at Harvard University.

  15. A N Whitehead: 'Autobiographical Notes
    • During the year 1924, at the age of sixty-three, I received the honour of an invitation to join the Faculty of Harvard University in the Philosophy, Department.
    • It is out of the question to deal with Harvard and its many influences at the end of a chapter.

  16. The Tercentenary of the birth of James Gregory
    • D., Harvard University, U.S.A.

  17. Cochran: 'Sampling Techniques' Introduction
    • Professor of Statistics, Harvard University .

  18. Smith's History Papers
    • It is now known that this was the work of Isaac Greenwood who held for some years the chair of mathematics in what was then Harvard College.

  19. Hardy in the USA
    • I am pro Princeton, Harvard, NY [crossed out], Columbia, Georgia, Penn {crossed out]: anti Yale, Army.

  20. Ahlfors' Complex Analysis preface
    • In Harvard, for instance, the course is also traditionally used to review advanced calculus with complete rigour in view.

  21. Raoul Bott on John Nash
    • Later when he came to MIT and started his work in geometry, I unfortunately wasn't at Harvard yet.

  22. Menger on the Calculus of Variations
    • G D Birkhoff (Harvard University) was the first to consider so-called mini-max problems dealing with "stationary" curves which are minimizing with respect to certain neighbouring curves and at the same time maximizing with respect to other curves.

  23. DArcy Thompson knighted
    • He was Lowell Lecturer at Harvard University last year.

  24. Poem for Benjamin Peirce
    • Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894) was a poet, physician and professor at the Harvard Medical School.

  25. E P Adams
    • In 1903 those four were joined by P E Robinson and E P Adams, the latter having just completed 4 years of graduate work at Harvard, Berlin, Gottingen, and Trinity College, Cambridge, after taking his bachelor's degree at Beloit College in 1899.

  26. Ahlfors' reviews
    • Two courses of lectures of the author which were extant in note form, "Conformal mapping" given at Oklahoma A and M College 1951 and "Variational methods in function theory" given at Harvard University 1953, were employed in the preparation of the monograph under review.

  27. Phillip Griffiths Looks at 'Two Cultures' Today
    • Gerald Holton of Harvard is one of those who believes that the gulf between cultures is wider than ever.

  28. An interview with Prof Eduardo L Ortiz
    • He was John Simon Guggenheim Research Fellow in the Department of History at Harvard University from 1996 to 1998.

  29. Atiyah's students
    • Lectured at: Harvard University, USA.

  30. Coolidge: 'Origin of Polar Coordinates
    • Harvard University, .

  31. Cochran: 'Sampling Techniques' Preface
    • Professor of Statistics, Harvard University .

  32. Veblen's Opening Address to ICM 1950
    • HARVARD UNIVERSITY .

  33. Serre reviews
    • This book is based on a course given by the author at Harvard University in the fall semester of 1988.

  34. Sarton Dedication
    • Harvard Library, 185.

  35. Bell books
    • If one thumbs the numerous cards for Eric Temple Bell in the Harvard College Library, one finds intermingled with those representing his mathematical work some endorsed "John Taine, pseud." and representing something else - "thrillers." Thus does a great library override the author's modest pseudonymity.

  36. Who was who 1852
    • The compiler of our Who's Who would have found a single research mathematician in this country, namely Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880), professor at Harvard since 1833, whose work on linear associative algebra was really fundamental.

  37. Lawson: Merchiston Castle
    • Lectures were given, not only by Professor Turnbull of St Andrews on his six-years research into Gregory's unpublished papers, but also by professors from the Sorbonne, from Denmark, from Harvard, and from Edinburgh University.

  38. Hilbert quotes
    • He was among the first with whom the liver treatment, inaugurated by G R Minot at Harvard, proved successful; undoubtedly it saved Hilbert's life at that time.


Quotations

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Famous Curves

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Chronology

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EMS Archive

  1. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Raymond C Archibald studied in Canada, at Harvard and at Strasbourg.
    • Edwin Adams studied at Harvard, Gottingen and Cambridge and became Physics Professor at Princeton.
    • Raymond Brink was an American mathematician who studied at Kansas State University, Harvard and Paris.
    • She went on to a doctorate in Chemistry and studied at the University of Illinois and at Harvard.
    • George Birkhoff was an American mathematician who was educated at Chicago and Harvard.
    • He became a Professor at Harvard.

  2. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Edwin Adams studied at Harvard, Gottingen and Cambridge and became Physics Professor at Princeton.
    • Raymond C Archibald studied in Canada, at Harvard and at Strasbourg.
    • George Birkhoff was an American mathematician who was educated at Chicago and Harvard.
    • He became a Professor at Harvard.
    • Raymond Brink was an American mathematician who studied at Kansas State University, Harvard and Paris.
    • She went on to a doctorate in Chemistry and studied at the University of Illinois and at Harvard.

  3. Edinburgh Mathematical Society Lecturers 1883-1964
    • (Harvard) On the number of ways of colouring a map, {Communicated by H W Turnbull} .
    • (Harvard) (Hardy Lecturer) Some problems in the theory of finite groups .
    • (Harvard) (Hardy Lecturer) What is an instanton? .
    • (Harvard) (Hardy Lecturer) Randomized algorithms in number theory .
    • (ENS Paris / Harvard) Linear fluid models as scaling limits of interacting systems of particles .

  4. EMS 1938 Colloquium
    • Professor of Mathematics in Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    • F.R.S.; Professor G D Birkhoff, of Harvard University, Massachusetts; Dr W O Kermack, LLJD., and Professor E T Whittaker, F.R.S.
    • The graduands were Professor G D Birkhoff (Harvard), Professor A W Conway (Dublin), Professor Otto Neugebauer (Copenhagen), Professor R Weitzenbock (Amsterdam), and in absentia Professor V Volterra (Rome).

  5. EMS Members
    • BIRKHOFF, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A.

  6. EMS 1996 Colloquium
    • (c) Professor Persi Diaconis (Harvard) - "Patterns in eigenvalues." .

  7. EMS 1926 Colloquium
    • Professor of Mathematics in Harvard University, U.S.A.


BMC Archive

  1. Gminutes2016.html
    • Plenary lectures will be given by Eva Bayer-Fluckiger (Lausanne), Kenji Fukaya (Stonybrook), Isabelle Gallagher (Paris 7), Laurent Lafforgue (IHES), George Lusztig (MIT) and Jacob Lurie (Harvard).
    • A public lecture will be given by Noam Elkies (Harvard).

  2. SCminutes2015b.html
    • The public speaker will be Noam Elkies of Harvard University.
    • plenary speakers: Eva Bayer-Fluckiger, Lausanne; Isabelle Gallagher, Paris; George Lusztig, MIT; and Jacob Lurie, Harvard.

  3. SCminutes2016a.html
    • Andrew Lobb reported that plenary lectures will be given by Eva Bayer-Fluckiger (Lausanne), Kenji Fukaya (Stonybrook), Isabelle Gallagher (Paris 7), Laurent Lafforgue (IHES), George Lusztig (MIT) and Jacob Lurie (Harvard).
    • A public lecture will be given by Noam Elkies (Harvard).

  4. Minutes for 1999
    • Suggestions were: one of B Mazur (Harvard), K Ribet (Berkeley), J Coates (Cambridge), H Lenstra (Berkeley).

  5. Minutes for 2011
    • (Harvard) (morning speaker 1995), Don Zagier (plenary 1985), Ken Ribet (Berkeley), Andrew .

  6. Minutes for 1999
    • Taubes (Harvard, global analysis) have agreed to be plenary speakers, and Borcherds, Gowers, Artin, Ribet, Diamond, Manin, and Witten have declined.

  7. Report2015.html
    • Peter Kronheimer (Harvard, Existence theorems in low-dimensional topology) .

  8. BMC Report
    • L Mahadevan (Harvard) .

  9. Minutes for 1997
    • The following were proposed as main speakers for the 1999 BMC at Southampton University: B Mazur (Harvard),J Birman (Columbia), V Arnol'd (Paris).


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