Search Results for Padua


Biographies

  1. Ugo Morin (1901-1968)
    • Died: 1 January 1968 in Padua, Italy .
    • He was awarded a diploma qualifying him as a captain in the merchant navy but then went to the University of Padua where he studied mathematical sciences.
    • At Padua he was taught by Annibale Comessatti who became his thesis advisor.
    • Morin received his laurea in 1926 from the University of Padua and he was then appointed as Comessatti's assistant.
    • Morin married on 18 June 1927 remaining as an assistant at Padua until 1935.
    • In 1935 he became a lecturer in descriptive geometry at the University of Padua and held this position until December 1942.
    • At Padua he came under the influence of several prominent anti-Fascists so, to understand what was going on, we must give a brief background to the Italian Fascist movement.
    • Several of the mathematicians at Padua were very active opponents of Fascism, including Eugenio Curiel (1912-1945), who had been appointed assistant professor of rational mechanics in February 1934, Ernesto Laura (1879-1949), the professor of rational mechanics from 1922 and director of the mathematics seminar, and Giuseppe Zwirner (1904-1979), who worked on ordinary differential equations and was very active in the anti-Fascist Giustizia e Liberta movement.
    • Morin was influenced by these men and also by several other leading anti-Fascists in the University of Padua who were in other departments, particularly Egidio Meneghetti (1892-1961), professor of pharmacology at Padua and a leading figure of the Giustizia e Liberta movement and Norberto Bobbio (1909-2004), who started teaching at the University of Padua in philosophy of law in 1942 and who, in that year, joined the Partito d'Azione, a socialist anti-Fascist party.
    • He held this chair until February 1946 when he returned to Padua to take up the chair that his former advisor Annibale Comessatti (who died in September 1945) had held.
    • When Morin moved from Padua to Florence in 1942 he certainly did not give up his association with Padua for he frequently travelled between the two cities.
    • He certainly did not want to leave his students and colleagues in Padua and made every effort to keep in contact.
    • With his frequent trips between the cities, Morin was able to maintain contacts between the anti-Fascists in Padua and those in Florence.
    • On 9 November 1943 Concetto Marchesi (1878-1957), the rector of the University of Padua, gave a speech to inaugurate the new academic year.
    • He travelled between Padua and Florence, as he had before, but now he was forced to do so under a false name.
    • By the end of November 1944 Morin was acting as the representative of the Partito d'Azione in the National Liberation Committee of Padua and in January 1945 he entered the National Liberation Committee in Venice.
    • In 1946 he returned to his professorship in Padua and he restarted his mathematical career.
    • From 1951 to 1956 he served as a member of the Socialist Party on the Padua City Council.

  2. David Cariolaro (1969-2014)
    • Born: 12 July 1969 in Padua, Italy .
    • Died: 10 January 2014 in Padua, Italy .
    • Gianfranco Cariolaro trained as an electrical engineer and, in the year before his son David was born, gained the right to teach at the University of Padua.
    • In 1975 he became a full professor at Padua.
    • David Cariolaro entered the Liceo Scientifico "Enrico Fermi" in Padua in 1983, graduating from the high school in 1988.
    • He then undertook military service in 1994-95 working as an auxiliary firefighter at the Padua Fire Station.
    • The "very difficult time of my life" must relate to the thanks he expressed to Dr Fernando Della Pietra, a psychiatrist from the Department of Mental Health of the Hospital of Padua:- .
    • On 20 September David had a serious accident and is currently struggling for his life in the hospital in Sozhu, assisted by his wife and father, Prof Gianfranco Cariolaro of the University of Padua.
    • During the trip, the professor from Padua was accompanied by a team consisting of neurosurgeons, anesthetists and resuscitation experts from the Hospital of Padua authorized by the Venetian governor Luca Zaia.
    • On Saturday morning the hospital in Padua issued a first medical report, in which it noted that the condition of the professor, who was admitted around midnight, "was substantially stable despite the challenging transportation, but his condition was serious." .
    • Although he regained consciousness after being treated in Padua, Cariolaro's condition worsened in early January 2014 as the result of an infection.

  3. Annibale Comessatti (1886-1945)
    • Died: 13 September 1945 in Padua, Italy .
    • In the same year he entered the University of Padua where he studied pure mathematics, taught by a number of excellent teachers including Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro, Tullio Levi-Civita, Giuseppe Veronese, and Francesco Severi who was appointed to Padua in 1905 when Comessatti was in his second year of study [',' A Tonolo, Obituary: Annibale Comessatti (Italian), Rend.
    • In 1908, after graduating, Comessatti was appointed as Severi's assistant at the University of Padua.
    • He was released from military service in January 1919 and was able to return to his positions at the University of Padua.
    • During the year 1922-23 he was called to the extraordinary professorship in Descriptive Geometry and its Applications at the University of Padua.
    • He continued to hold this chair in Padua for the rest of his life, but during the years 1924-27 he taught analytic geometry, additional mathematics, and higher geometry at the University of Ferrara.
    • One of his best students at Padua was Ugo Morin who, after studying with Comessatti, graduated in 1926 and then served as Comessatti's assistant at Padua.
    • Several of the mathematicians at Padua were very active opponents of Fascism, including Ugo Morin, Comessatti's student and later his assistant.
    • On 26 April 1947 a commemoration of Comessatti's life and work was held in the University of Padua.
    • The affection for Comessatti was shown by the many friends, alumni and students from the University of Padua who attended.

  4. Giovanni Poleni (1683-1761)
    • Died: 15 November 1761 in Padua, Venetian States (now Italy) .
    • He accepted the chair of Astronomy and Meteorology at the University of Padua in 1709.
    • He was appointed to the chair of mathematics at Padua in 1719 which had been vacated by Nicolaus (II) Bernoulli.
    • In fact Padua had been fortunate to have had Jakob Hermann teaching there from 1707 to 1713 and he had introduced the methods of Leibniz's differential and integral calculus to the university.
    • The topics which Poleni taught at the University of Padua reflect his interests and the different chairs to which he was appointed.
    • Some were purchased but most were made in Venice or Padua to Poleni's own specifications.
    • Around 100 of Poleni's instruments still survive and can be seen in a Museum at Padua.
    • placed the School of Natural Philosophy in Padua on the same level as the most famous of its kind.
    • Poleni was appointed to the chair of Nautical Studies and Naval Construction at Padua in 1756.

  5. Tullio Levi-Civita (1873-1941)
    • Born: 29 March 1873 in Padua, Veneto, Italy .
    • Tullio, born into a Jewish family, attended secondary school in Padua where he showed his outstanding abilities.
    • He then studied for his degree in the Faculty of Mathematics of the University of Padua where he enrolled in 1890.
    • Levi-Civita was appointed to the Chair of Rational Mechanics at Padua in 1898, a post which he was to hold for 20 years.
    • In particular in 1909 Castelnuovo tried hard to persuade him to move, but Levi-Civita was happy to remain in Padua.
    • Levi-Civita was a pacifist with firm socialist ideas and it may well have been that he felt Padua suited his personality better than Rome at the time.
    • While teaching at Padua, Libera Trevisani was one of his pupils and they married in 1914.
    • The paper was requested by Klein when he met Levi-Civita in Padua in 1899 and, following Klein's wishes, it appeared in Mathematische Annalen.

  6. Jakob Hermann (1678-1733)
    • When the chair of mathematics in Padua became vacant, Leibniz wrote to Fardella, who taught in Padua from 1693 to 1709, on 7 December 1704 giving a high opinion of Hermann's abilities.
    • Because of the strong recommendation, Hermann was appointed to the chair of mathematics at the University of Padua on 28 April 1707.
    • He travelled to Veneto where he spent the summer, arriving in Padua at the beginning of August.
    • One of the ways in which Hermann made the Leibnizian calculus known in Italy while he was in Padua was through frequent exchanges, by letter and in person, with Italian mathematicians, scientists, diplomats and scholars.
    • In pursuit of his ambition to promote mathematical research in Italy while he was in Padua, Hermann decided to publish the results he had obtained on the central forces in Italian.
    • In fact, while in Padua, Hermann lectured on the standard topics of the day, namely classical geometry, mechanics, optics, hydraulics, and gnomonics.
    • It was while he was in Padua that Hermann did most of the work on his most famous book, the Phoronomia Ⓣ, which is a text on mechanics.
    • Hermann held his post in Padua until his contract expired on 28 April 1713.
    • While in Padua he had asked Leibniz's advice about moving to a university in another country and Leibniz had suggested a position in Frankfurt-an-der-Oder, but advised Hermann to see out the six year contract he had signed with Padua.
    • After leaving Padua in April, he went to Vicenza where he lived at the home of Giovanni Checozzi (1691-1756) and Sebastiano Checozzi (1693-1719) until June, after which he went first to Basel and subsequently to Frankfurt-an-der-Oder to take up his new appointment.

  7. Francesco Severi (1879-1961)
    • Severi only worked at Parma for one year, accepting the chair at Padua in 1905.
    • Severi continued his left-wing political position by joining the Blocco Popolare Patavino after taking up the chair in Padua.
    • This led to his appointment as director of the municipal gas and water company in Padua.
    • He joined the Socialist party in 1910 and was immediately elected as a Socialist Party councillor for Padua.
    • In 1914, when Severi held his chair in Padua, World War I broke out but, shortly after hostilities began on 3 August, Italy declared that it would not commit troops to the fighting.
    • Severi's tenure of the chair at Padua was interrupted by the war and he volunteered for military service as soon as Italy joined the war in 1915.
    • After he was demobbed, Severi returned to his chair in Padua where he remained until 1922 when he was appointed to the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Rome.
    • When the war finished, in Padua, where I was Director of that School of Engineers, I faced up to the Bolshevik movement with the fighters.
    • For Severi by then was (among other things) President of an Arezzo bank, head of the engineering faculty at Padua, an expert agriculturist who managed his own estate.

  8. Giovanni Magini (1555-1617)
    • Born: 13 June 1555 in Padua, Venetian States (now Italy) .
    • Giovanni Magini's father, Pasquale Magini, was a citizen of Padua.
    • Two quadrants exit, one with the inscription "Giovanni Antonio Magini of Padua designed this in Bologna in the year 1592", the other is dated 1595 and inscribed "Giovanni Antonio Magini Professor of Mathematics in the University of Bologna had this made".
    • During the Easter holidays of 1610, Galileo stopped in Bologna on his way from Padua to Florence to stay at the house of his colleague Giovanni Antonio Magini ..

  9. Jacopo Riccati (1676-1754)
    • Family tradition meant that Riccati would be expected to continue his studies after college by taking a law degree and this is precisely the course he followed when he enrolled at the University of Padua in 1693.
    • Although he entered Padua to read law, Jacopo Riccati was certainly interested in the sciences, particularly in astronomy, so, as well as courses in law, he attended an astronomy course taught by Stephano degli Angeli.
    • This encounter with the Principia encouraged Riccati to study mathematics but he completed his law degree, graduating from the University of Padua on 7 June 1696.
    • Riccati was of independent means and had a large estate at Castelfranco Veneto, a small town about 30 km north of Padua and about 40 km north west of Venice.
    • He soon attained fame and turned down an offer from Peter the Great to become President of the St Petersburg Academy of Science in around 1725, an offer of the chair of mathematics at the University of Padua, as well as other tempting offers such as Advisor to the Court in Vienna.
    • These include: Giovanni Rizzetti (1675-1751), famed as a critic of Newton's theory of light; Gabriele Manfredi, professor of mathematics and chancellor of the University of Bologna, and the brother of eminent mathematician and astronomer Eustachio Manfredi; Giovanni Poleni, who was a professor at the University of Padua; Antonio Vallisneri (1661-1730), who held the chairs of Practical Medicine and Theoretical Medicine at the University of Padua and was an editor of the Giornale de' Letterati d'Italia; Ramiro Rampinelli, a mathematician who was a professor at Rome and at Bologna; and Bernardino Zendrini (1679-1747), a scientist working for the Republic of Venice.
    • Suzzi and da Riva were students of exceptional quality, becoming professors of mathematics and astronomy, respectively, at the University of Padua.

  10. Iacopo Barsotti (1921-1987)
    • Died: 27 October 1987 in Padua, Italy .
    • Barsotti was not, however, to spend the rest of his career at Pisa for, in 1968, he moved to Padua to take up the chair of geometry at the university there.
    • He published a number of articles on the theta function after moving to Padua, for example Considerazioni sulle funzioni theta (1970) which aims to bring the classical theory of theta functions of several variables within the scope of abstract algebraic geometry.

  11. Giuseppe Veronese (1854-1917)
    • Died: 17 July 1917 in Padua, Italy .
    • Bellavitis died in November 1880 and his chair of algebraic geometry in Padua became vacant.
    • He served as a member of the Parliament of Chioggia from 1897 to 1900, then later he served as a member of the Padua City Council, finally being a Senator from 1904 until his death.

  12. Nicholas Kryffs (1401-1464)
    • In Heidelberg Nicholas studied liberal arts, particularly philosophy, for a year before going to the University of Padua in 1417.
    • At Padua he studied canon law under Giuliano Cesarini, who was only three years older than Nicholas, having just completed his own doctorate in canon law at Padua.
    • At Padua he became friends with fellow student Paolo dal Pozzo Toscanelli, who was studying mathematics and medicine.
    • It was in Padua that Nicholas learnt about the latest developments in mathematics and astronomy and, twenty years later, Nicholas dedicated two of his mathematical works to Toscanelli.
    • Giovanni Andrea Bussi (1417-1475), humanist and Bishop of Aleria from 1469, later became a friend of Nicholas and wrote about Nicholas's student days at Padua:- .
    • Nicholas graduated with a doctorate in canon law from Padua in 1423 and, after spending some time in Rome, he matriculated at the University of Cologne in the spring of 1425 to study divinity.

  13. Giuseppe Biancani (1566-1624)
    • Between 1596 and 1599, he was studying at the Jesuit College in Padua.
    • Galileo had been appointed professor of mathematics at the University of Padua, the university of the Republic of Venice, in 1592 and Biancani became acquainted with him during his years in Padua.
    • I love and admire Galileo, not only for his rare learning and invention, but also for the old friendship that I had with him in Padua, where I was overcome by his courtesy and affection, which bound me to him.
    • It is also worth recounting the tensions in Padua during the years that Biancani studied there.
    • The Jesuit College, established in Padua in 1542, had become an important educational establishment by 1590 offering a three-year philosophy degree; logic was taught in year one, natural philosophy and physical science in year two, and metaphysics and natural philosophy in year three.
    • The Jesuit College was accused of being a rival university to the University of Padua, something which was illegal by Venetian law.

  14. Luigi Brusotti (1877-1959)
    • Died: 30 April 1959 in Padua, Italy .

  15. Alessandro Padoa (1868-1937)
    • He began studying engineering at the University of Padua but then, for family reasons, he moved to the University of Turin in January 1889.
    • Beginning in 1898 he gave a series of lectures at the Universities of Brussels (1898), Pavia (1899), Rome (1900, 1901, 1903), Padua (1905), Cagliari (1907) and Geneva (1911).
    • He lectured at congresses in Paris (1900, 1935), Rome (1908), Cambridge (1912), Livorno, Parma, Padua, Bologna (1911, 1928) and Florence (1937).
    • Let us now look briefly at Padua's research contributions.
    • M Padoa - previously my distinguished student and now my colleague and my friend - has given to this subject, since 1898, a series of well-attended conferences in the Universities of Brussels, Pavia, Rome, Padua, Cagliari and Geneva, and has presented highly regarded papers to the Congresses of philosophy and mathematics in Paris, Livorno, Parma, Padua and Bologna.

  16. Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro (1853-1925)
    • Then, from 1880 until his death in 1925 he was professor of mathematical physics at the University of Padua.
    • He did not only teach mathematical physics, however, for from 1891 he also taught courses on advanced algebra at Padua.
    • It was only after he was appointed to the chair at Padua that he had the security that would allow him to marry and, in 1884, he married Bianca Bianchi Azzarani.
    • Later he served as a councillor for Padua and there his interests included school education and finance.
    • Offered the position of mayor of Padua, however, he declined.
    • He also was a member of the Accademia dei Lincei from 1899, the Accademia di Padua from 1905, the Academy of Sciences of Turin from 1918, the Societa dei Quaranta from 1921, the Reale Accademia di Bologna from 1922 and the Accademia Pontifica from 1925.

  17. Thomas Fincke (1561-1656)
    • He now began his study of medicine in Basel, continuing it Padua in November 1583.
    • He spent four years in Padua, interspersed with short visits to other universities, namely Siena in 1585 and Pisa in 1586.
    • Fincke made a big impression in Padua and, although he was only twenty-six years old when he left, his achievements in founding a medical library were so highly appreciated that a marble pillar with inscribed commemorative plaque was put in the local church 'Santa Sofia' in his honour.
    • His medical teachers had been Felix Plater (1536-1614) and Theodor Zwinger (1533-1588) at Basel, and Hieronymus Fabricius (1537-1619) and Giulo Casserio (1545-1605) at Padua.
    • He did not entirely leave behind his interest in mathematics and astronomy, however, for he was friendly with Giovanni Antonio Magini while at Padua and, after he returned to his home town of Flensburg after the award of his doctorate, he continued to correspond with Magini.

  18. Benedetto Castelli (1578-1643)
    • He began studying mathematics while in Brescia but, after he was transferred to the monastery of Saint Giustina in Padua, he came into contact with Galileo.
    • Galileo had been appointed as professor of mathematics at the University of Padua (the university of the Republic of Venice) in 1592 and he lived near to Saint Giustina.
    • He was particularly keen to return to Padua so that he could learn more from Galileo but, around this time, Galileo resigned his post at Padua and moved to Florence becoming Chief Mathematician at the University of Pisa (without any teaching duties) and 'Mathematician and Philosopher' to the Grand Duke of Tuscany.
    • For about a dozen years Castelli had been teaching at the University of Rome under the patronage of the pope (Maffeo Barberini) and his nephew (Cardinal Francesco Barberini), but at a general convention of Benedictines that year Castelli (who belonged to this order) had been appointed abbot of a convent near Padua with the duty of being in residence there; however, the decision was not implemented because of the opposition of the Barberinis.

  19. Corrado Gini (1884-1965)
    • In 1913 he was appointed to the chair of statistics at the University of Padua.
    • At Padua he taught political economy, constitutional law, demography and economic statistics.
    • The study of demography, the science of population of a society, was one that interested Gini over a long period and his work on this topic had begun before he moved to Padua, for he had published I fattori demografici dell'evoluzione delle Nazioni Ⓣ in 1912.
    • At Padua, Gini established a Statistical Institute in 1920.
    • In 1923 Gini left Padua, when he was appointed to the University of Rome.

  20. Ugo Amaldi (1875-1957)
    • Edoardo was an Austrian magistrate who was near Padua when the Second Italian War of Independence broke out in 1859.
    • Amaldi transferred to Modena in 1906, where he was appointed a professor in Analytical and Projective Geometry, then in 1919 he moved to Padua where he was a professor of Descriptive Geometry with Applications until 1922.
    • Remaining in Padua, he was appointed to the chair of Analytical Geometry in 1922, a position he held for two years.
    • The work of which we present the first volume, has come about through the teaching of rational mechanics, which one of us has professed for over twenty years in Padua and Rome, the other for six years in Modena and Padua.

  21. James Gregory (1638-1675)
    • He visited Flanders, Rome and Paris on his journey but spent most time at the University of Padua where he worked on using infinite convergent series to find the areas of the circle and hyperbola.
    • At Padua he worked closely with Angeli whose [',' H W Turnbull, James Gregory (1638-1675), in The James Gregory Tercentenary Memorial Volume (London, 1939), 5-11.','20]:- .
    • In Padua Gregory was able to live in the house of the Professor of Philosophy who was Professor Caddenhead, a fellow Scot.
    • Two works which were published by Gregory while he was in Padua are Vera circuli et hyperbolae quadratura published in 1667 and Geometriae pars universalis published right at the end of his Italian visit in 1668.
    • Before he left Padua Gregory published Geometriae pars universalis which is really [',' A Prag, On James Gregory’s Geometriae pars universalis, in The James Gregory Tercentenary Memorial Volume (London, 1939), 487-509.','13]:- .

  22. Stephano degli Angeli (1623-1697)
    • In addition to this religious role he continued to be heavily involved in teaching and research in mathematics and he was appointed professor of mathematics at University of Padua on 2 January 1662.
    • James Gregory studied with Angeli in Padua from 1664 to 1668 and learnt from him about series expansions of functions.
    • In fact the Jesuati Order was suppressed in 1668 by Pope Clement IX who believed that abuses had crept in over the years, but Angeli continued in the priesthood while holding the chair of mathematics at Padua.
    • He published Della gravita dell aria e fluidi in 1671 while holding the chair at Padua.
    • Of course Angeli held the chair at Padua which had been held earlier by Galileo and his work shows strong influences from his predecessor.

  23. Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543)
    • He set off again for Italy, his time going to Padua.
    • Padua was famous for its medical school and while he was there Copernicus studied both medicine and astronomy.
    • After receiving his doctorate, Copernicus stayed in Ferrara for a few months before returning to Padua to continue his studies of medicine.
    • There is no record that he ever graduated from Padua.

  24. Simon Mayr (1573-1624)
    • He then went to Padua where he studied medicine.
    • Mayr was admitted to the Association of German Students of Arts at the University of Padua on 18 December 1601, donating 6 Venetian lire to the association (he donated 10 lire in each of the following four years).
    • His actions in this capacity contributed to him earning a poor reputation for after he had left Padua on 1 July 1605 [',' Biography by Edward Rosen in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (New York 1970-1990).
    • I speak of Simon Mayr of Gunzenhausen; he it was in Padua, where I resided at the time, who set forth in Latin the use of the said compass of mine and, appropriating it to himself, had one of his pupils print this under his name.

  25. Frederico Commandino (1506-1575)
    • He took up this appointment in June 1534 but on 25 September 1534 Pope Clement died and Commandino then went to the University of Padua.
    • Bernardino Baldi, who was a student of Commandino in the latter part of his life and wrote a short biography of him in 1587, claimed that he studied philosophy and medicine at Padua from 1534 to 1544 but one should not suppose that this means that he was a student for ten years.
    • Padua was famous for its medical school but despite this he took his medical degree from the University of Ferrara.
    • It is worth noting that Copernicus followed a very similar path some 40 years earlier, for he also studied medicine at Padua and took a degree from the University of Ferrara; in Copernicus's case however his Ferrara degree was in law and not medicine.

  26. Giuseppe Vitali (1875-1932)
    • Then, in December 1925, Vitali was appointed to the chair of mathematical analysis at the University of Padua.
    • Despite serious health problems, Vitali was able to make huge contributions to Padua during the five years that he worked there.
    • He became the first director of the 'Seminario matematico of the University of Padua' which he himself founded.
    • This aimed to encourage both teaching and research in mathematics in Padua by organising conferences, workshops and seminars.

  27. Albertus (about 1200-1280)
    • His uncle lived in Padua so, since the university there was famous for liberal arts, it was a natural place for his studies.
    • After studying liberal arts at the University of Padua he joined the Dominican Order at Padua in 1223 being attracted by the teachings of Jordan of Saxony who was the head of the Order.
    • After joining the Dominican Order, he studied and taught at Padua, Bologna, Cologne and other German convents in Hildesheim, Freiburg, Ratisbon, Strasbourg, and Cologne.

  28. Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)
    • With strong recommendations from Guidobaldo del Monte, Galileo was appointed professor of mathematics at the University of Padua (the university of the Republic of Venice) in 1592 at a salary of three times what he had received at Pisa.
    • At Padua his duties were mainly to teach Euclid's geometry and standard (geocentric) astronomy to medical students, who would need to know some astronomy in order to make use of astrology in their medical practice.
    • At Padua, Galileo began a long term relationship with Maria Gamba, who was from Venice, but they did not marry perhaps because Galileo felt his financial situation was not good enough.
    • However he had succeeded in impressing Cosimo and, in June 1610, only a month after his famous little book was published, Galileo resigned his post at Padua and became Chief Mathematician at the University of Pisa (without any teaching duties) and 'Mathematician and Philosopher' to the Grand Duke of Tuscany.

  29. James Stirling (1692-1770)
    • Nicolaus(I) Bernoulli occupied the chair at the University of Padua from 1716 until 1722.
    • In 1721 Stirling was in Padua and we know that he attended the University of Padua at that time.
    • In 1722 Stirling returned to Glasgow, perhaps around the time that his friend Nicolaus(I) Bernoulli left Padua.

  30. Giordano Bruno (1548-1600)
    • He was clearly aware that Padua were looking to fill the chair of mathematics and Bruno thought that this would give him just the platform he wanted to make his views more widely known.
    • He went to Padua where he wrote Lectures on Geometry and Art of Deformation.
    • He also taught a private course for German students in Padua at this time.
    • However by late 1591 the University of Padua made it clear to Bruno that they wanted Galileo to fill the vacant chair mathematics and not him.

  31. Gino Loria (1862-1954)
    • Achille became a famous political economist, being professor of political economy in the University of Sienna (1881-1891), the University of Padua (1891-1903) and the University of Torino (1903-1932).
    • Gino, like his elder brother, was educated at the lyceum in Padua, entering in 1875 and graduating in 1879.
    • He gave the main plenary lecture at the Mathesis Congress in Padua in September 1909, choosing as his title La scuola media e la sua attuale crisi di sviluppo Ⓣ.

  32. Joachim Jungius (1587-1657)
    • After some time studying there, he went to Padua to continued medical education:- .
    • he must have found the atmosphere of Padua congenial, because of the school's emphasis on a research-oriented natural philosophy, medical training, and mathematics.
    • He received a medical degree from the University of Padua on 1 January 1619.

  33. Guidobaldo del Monte (1545-1607)
    • Guidobaldo studied mathematics at the University of Padua in 1564.
    • In fact Guidobaldo may have known Tasso before they studied at Padua together, for Tasso was almost exactly the same age as Guidobaldo and had been educated at the court of the Duke of Urbino, with the duke's son, from 1556.
    • While we are discussing Guidobaldo and Galileo, we should note that as well as giving Galileo financial support, Guidobaldo supported him for the professorship of mathematics at the University of Padua in 1592.

  34. Francesco Barozzi (1537-1604)
    • Francesco attended school in Padua where he learnt Greek and Latin, then he studied at the University of Padua where mathematics was part of his course.
    • He does not appear to have held any posts, although he did lecture at the University of Padua in 1559.

  35. Girolamo Cardano (1501-1576)
    • When war broke out, the university was forced to close and Cardan moved to the University of Padua to complete his studies.
    • Cardan, on the advice of a friend, went to Sacco, a small village 15km from Padua.

  36. Giusto Bellavitis (1803-1880)
    • He was appointed professor of geometry at Padua on 4 January 1845 after a competitive examination to find the best candidate for the chair.
    • In 1867, Bellavitis moved from the chair of geometry at Padua to take the chair of complementary algebra and analytic geometry there.

  37. Giacomo Albanese (1890-1948)
    • He returned to his position in Pisa at the end of World War I but in 1919 he moved to Padua to become Francesco Severi's assistant.
    • Albanese left Padua in the year 1920 to take up a professorship in analysis and algebra at the Naval Academy in Livorno which, as happened with Italian chairs, he had won after a competition.

  38. Gaetano Scorza (1876-1939)
    • Giuseppe Scorza-Dragoni (1908-1996) went on to write a laurea advised by Severi (at his father's request) and was professor of mathematical analysis at Padua from 1936 to 1962, and at Rome from 1962 to 1966.
    • After eight years as professor of algebra at Bologna from 1966, he returned to Padua where he worked until he retired.

  39. Wilhelm Blaschke (1885-1962)
    • Blaschke, who had made a lecture tour of Italy in the summer of 1942 and was awarded an honorary degree by Padua University at that time, returned to Italy later that year to attend another Congress in Rome from 9 to 12 November 1942, This was at the time when the fighting of World War II was at its most intense.
    • In addition to an honorary degree which he received from Padua, which we mentioned above, Blaschke also received honorary degrees from Sofia University, Greifswald University and Karlsruhe Technische Hochschule.

  40. Vincenzo Riccati (1707-1775)
    • Jacopo Riccati was of independent means and had a large estate at Castelfranco Veneto, a small town about 30 km north of Padua and about 40 km north west of Venice.
    • In 1729 he moved to the College in Padua where he both taught and studied, then he moved to the College of Santa Caterina in Parma in 1734.

  41. Mineo Chini (1866-1933)
    • He also gave lectures on infinitesimal calculus at the University of Padua.
    • He obtained his 'libera docenza' (similar to the habilitation in that it is the 'right to teach') in infinitesimal calculus in Padua, and now teaches in technical institutes.

  42. Gianfrancesco Malfatti (1731-1807)
    • Toaldo was a physicist who held the chair of astronomy at the University of Padua.
    • Caldani was professor of anatomy in Padua.

  43. Antonio Mario Lorgna (1735-1796)
    • In 1759 Contarini came to the end of his time as governor of Dalmatia, and he arranged for Lorgna to enrol in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Padua, where he attended lectures on mathematics by Giovanni Poleni.
    • Colombo was also interested in architecture and just before Lorgna entered the University of Padua he had been involved in a project to restore the university's bell tower.

  44. Roberto Marcolongo (1862-1943)
    • Marcolongo then began applying for chairs so, in 1897, entered competitions for the chair of rational mechanics at the University of Padua and the chair of higher mathematics at the University of Turin.
    • The Ministry of Education, which had to make the final decisions based on the advice from the judging panels, offered Marcolongo the Padua chair but he turned it down.

  45. Marino Ghetaldi (1568-1626)
    • Leaving Paris, Ghetaldi returned to Italy, spending some time in Padua where he came into contact with Galileo in 1600.
    • He left Padua in 1601 and spent time in other centres of scientific research before arriving back in Rome in 1602.

  46. Salvatore Cherubino (1885-1970)
    • He was appointed to teach at the Women's Normal School at Siena in 1911, but in the following year, after winning another competition, he moved to Padua where again he taught in a secondary school.
    • At Padua, however, he was able to become involved with the mathematics department at the university where there were three outstanding professors.

  47. Guido Castelnuovo (1865-1952)
    • After he had completed his secondary education he studied mathematics at the University of Padua.
    • Castelnuovo graduated from Padua in 1886 and spent the following year in Rome on a postgraduate scholarship.

  48. Constantin Le Paige (1852-1929)
    • will sell the collection of the well-known bibliophile, le Chevalier Constantin Le Paige, of Liege, consisting of incunabula, antique manuscripts, valuable illustrated books, French literature, as, for example, first editions of Balzac, Bossuet, Corneille, Pascal, Rousseau, Voltaire; also mathematical and astronomical rarities, the commentary of Albertus de Brudzewo of 1494, printed in Milan, of which only two examples are known, the "Opus calculationum" of Suiseth (Padua of about 1477) and the first edition of Boethius "Arithmetica." The chief attraction is Dante's manuscript of 1493, which resembles the books written in Naples for King Matthias Corvinus.

  49. Enrico Magenes (1923-2010)
    • Magenes was appointed as an assistant at the University of Padua in 1948.

  50. Regiomontanus (1436-1476)
    • In the spring of 1464 he lectured at the University of Padua (in the Venetian Republic) and while there he observed the total eclipse of the moon on 21 April 1464.

  51. Giovanni Saccheri (1667-1733)
    • What is certainly true is that Saccheri was offered the chair of mathematics at the University of Padua (the university of the Republic of Venice) that had been filled by Galileo almost a century earlier.

  52. Emil Weyr (1848-1894)
    • In April 1871 Emil Weyr set off on a sightseeing tour of Italy, visiting Padua, Bologna, Pisa, Florence, Rome, and Naples.

  53. Raymond Archibald (1875-1955)
    • He was a delegate at the celebrations to mark the 700th anniversary of the founding of the University of Padua in 1922, and represented both the United States and Canada on the Euler Committee of the Swiss Society of Naturalists from 1922 to 1939.

  54. Brian Hartley (1939-1994)
    • In 1989 he visited the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Berkeley, California at Easter, Padua and Moscow in the summer, and East Berlin and Barcelona in the autumn.

  55. Johann Castillon (1704-1791)
    • He received further honours from foreign academies, being appointed a member of the Bologna Academy in 1768, the Mannheim Academy in 1777, the Padua Academy in 1784, and the Prague Academy in 1785.

  56. Nicolaus(I) Bernoulli (1687-1759)
    • Nicolaus Bernoulli was appointed to Galileo's chair at Padua in 1716 which Hermann had filled immediately prior to Nicolaus's appointment.

  57. Alfredo Capelli (1855-1910)
    • While at Palermo, Capelli collaborated with Giovanni Garbieri (1847-1931) who had succeeded Giusto Bellavitis at the University of Padua in 1882.

  58. Giuseppe Basso (1842-1895)
    • It continued until 1878 when Andrea Naccari (1841-1916), whose first degree was in Pure Mathematics from the University of Padua in 1862, was appointed as Ordinary Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Turin.

  59. Federigo Enriques (1871-1946)
    • Paolo Enriques became Professor of Zoology at the University of Padua and did important work on genetics.

  60. Tadeusz Banachiewicz (1882-1954)
    • Also in 1939 he was elected to the Padua Academy of Sciences.

  61. Michio Suzuki (1926-1998)
    • He was a visiting professor at the University of Padua in Italy in the summer of 1994.

  62. Lorenzo Mascheroni (1750-1800)
    • For his excellent contributions Mascheroni received a number of honours such as election to the Academy of Padua, the Royal Academy of Mantua and to the Societa Italiana delle Scienze.

  63. Enrico Bompiani (1889-1975)
    • Enrico had three brothers: Gaetano Bompiani was born in 1887 and became a medical professor at Sassari, Bari, Siena, Parma, Pisa, Padua and Rome; Arturo Bompiani was born in 1890 and also studied medicine, publishing important works on anatomy and obstetric physiology; Paolo Bompiani was born in 1891.

  64. John Maior (1469-1550)
    • He became an important avenue through which the writings of the fourteenth-century Mertonians, especially Bradwardine, Heytesbury, and Swineshead, exerted an influence in the schools of the sixteenth century, including those at Padua and Pisa, where the young Galileo received his education.

  65. Giulio Vivanti (1859-1949)
    • On 25 January 1887, Vivanti married Enrichetta Bianchini, the daughter of a 'landowner' from Padua.

  66. Georg Peurbach (1423-1461)
    • He lectured in Germany, France and Italy on astronomy and after giving lectures in Bologna and Padua he was offered appointments in these universities but turned them down.

  67. Domenico Montesano (1863-1930)
    • Again in 1905, when competitions for two chairs at Padua were advertised, Montesano acted as a referee for both.

  68. Fritz Zwicky (1898-1974)
    • Koenig writes [',' T Koenig, Fritz Zwicky: Novae Become Supernovae, in M Turatto, S Benetti, L Zampieri and W Shea (eds.), 1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Lighthouses, ASP Conference Series 342, Proceedings of the conference held 15-19 June, 2004 in Padua, Italy (Astronomical Society of the Pacific, San Francisco, 2005), 53-60.','10]:- .

  69. Giovanni Alfonso Borelli (1608-1679)
    • After a visit to Padua, his final destination was Venice, where he spent two months before taking a boat back to Messina.

  70. Alessandro Faedo (1913-2001)
    • His secondary education was at a boarding school in Padua.

  71. Gabriele Manfredi (1681-1761)
    • Gabriele Manfredi also studied with Guglielmini but, after his brother Eustachio turned to astronomy and Guglielmini left Bologna to move to Padua in 1699, Gabriele carried on studying mathematics on his own.

  72. Wolfgang Gaschütz (1920-2016)
    • Wolfgang Gaschutz was invited as a visiting professor to Michigan State University (1963), Queen Mary College of the University of London (1965, 1970), Universities of Padua, Florence, Naples (1966, 1971, 1974), University of Warwick (1967, 1973, 1977), University of Illinois at Chicago (1968), and the University of Canberra (1969).

  73. João Delgado (1553-1612)
    • The debate arose from the writings of Alessandro Piccolomini (1508-1578) who was born in Sienna, studied in Padua, Bologna and Rome, and taught in Sienna and Rome.

  74. Renato Caccioppoli (1904-1959)
    • In 1931 he was appointed to the Chair of Algebraic Analysis in Padua and eventually returned to Naples in 1934.

  75. Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782)
    • In Venice Daniel was severely ill and so was unable to carry out his intention of travelling to Padua to further his medical studies.

  76. Cuthbert Tunstall (1474-1559)
    • Between 1499 and 1505 Tunstall studied Canon and Roman law at Padua.

  77. Bruno de Finetti (1906-1985)
    • In the following years, he supplemented his work with several academic appointments, both in Trieste and Padua.

  78. Erasmus Bartholin (1625-1698)
    • From 1645 he studied mathematics at the University of Leiden, travelling to France in 1651 but then going to Italy where he studied at a number of places including Padua from where he received a medical degree in 1654.

  79. Eugenio Bertini (1846-1933)
    • From 1880 to 1892 he held a chair at the University of Pavia where he was part of what Cinquini describes in [',' S Cinquini, The golden decade of Pavian mathematics (1880-90) and its reprise at the beginning of the next century, in Faiths and cultures in the Padua area in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century, Pavia, 1991, Ann.

  80. Virgil Snyder (1869-1950)
    • He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Padua in 1922, at the celebrations for the 700th anniversary of its foundation.

  81. Tartaglia (1500-1557)
    • Ludovico Balbisonio took him to Padua to study there, but when he returned with his patron to Brescia he made himself unpopular by having an inflated opinion of himself.

  82. Leone Battista Alberti (1404-1472)
    • Leone Battista attended a school in Padua then, from 1421, he attended the University of Bologna where he studied law but did not enjoy this topic.

  83. Luigi Cremona (1830-1903)
    • The Austrian government arrested opposition leaders of the revolution in Venice and Milan, and suppressed student demonstrations in Padua and Pavia.


History Topics

  1. Galileo's Difesa
    • Galileo, at this time Professor at Padua, delivered three lectures on the nova which were so popular that no hall in Padua was large enough to accommodate the audience which came.
    • He also reprimanded Galileo for not acknowledging their prior discovery in the lectures he had given on the nova in Padua.
    • Since I doubt that anybody from this Studio is coming there, I should suggest setting up another congress here, in Padua in the presence of the Signori Rettori of the Town.
    • "That German, or Flemish man" was Eutel Zugmesser who is mentioned by Galileo in the Difesa as appearing in Padua around 1603 carrying an instrument very similar to Galileo's.
    • I further affirm that about ten years ago in Padua, Signor Galileo showed me the instrument (described in his book) and explained its uses; and that about two years later, the said Signor made me a present of one, which I still have in my possession.
    • he [Capra] endlessly claims around Padua that I copied this invention from a book, printed in Germany and in the German language, which he is going to receive and show to everybody.
    • I speak of Simon Mayr of Gunzenhausen; he it was in Padua, where I resided at the time, who set forth in Latin the use of the said compass of mine and, appropriating it to himself, had one of his pupils print this under his name.


Societies etc

  1. Italian Academy of Sciences
    • A physiologist who studied the electrical activity in the human brain, he worked first at Turin and later at Padua.
    • A Catholic priest and physicist, he edited Galileo's works and later became professor of astronomy at the University of Padua.
    • An anatomist and physiologist, he was professor of practical medicine at the University of Bologna and then professor of theoretical medicine at the University of Padua.
    • He was professor of Mathematics and Navigation at the University of Padua, then taught nautical science at Pavia.


Honours

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References

  1. References for Galileo Galilei
    • S Drake, Galileo's gleanings VI : Galileo's first telescope at Padua and Venive, Isis 50 (1959), 245-254.
    • Y Ogawa, Galileo's work on free fall at Padua : Some remarks on Drake's interpretation, Historia Sci.

  2. References for Giovanni Vailati
    • La ricerca di Giovanni Vailati e il suo confronto con il pensiero di Franz Brentano, Laurea Thesis, University of Padua (1990-2000).

  3. References for Joseph-Louis Lagrange
    • P Cossali, Elogio di L Lagrange (Padua, 1813).

  4. References for Felice Casorati
    • S Cinquini, The golden decade of Pavian mathematics (1880-90) and its reprise at the beginning of the next century (Italian), in Faiths and cultures in the Padua area in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century, Pavia, 1991, Ann.

  5. References for Eugenio Bertini
    • S Cinquini, The golden decade of Pavian mathematics (1880-90) and its reprise at the beginning of the next century, in Faiths and cultures in the Padua area in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century, Pavia, 1991, Ann.

  6. References for Fritz Zwicky
    • T Koenig, Fritz Zwicky: Novae Become Supernovae, in M Turatto, S Benetti, L Zampieri and W Shea (eds.), 1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Lighthouses, ASP Conference Series 342, Proceedings of the conference held 15-19 June, 2004 in Padua, Italy (Astronomical Society of the Pacific, San Francisco, 2005), 53-60.

  7. References for Francesco Gerbaldi
    • S Cinquini, The golden decade of Pavian mathematics (1880-90) and its reprise at the beginning of the next century (Italian), Faiths and cultures in the Padua area in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century (Italian) (Pavia, 1991), Ann.

  8. References for Regiomontanus
    • A Filipuzzi, The cultural ambience of Padua and Ferrara at the time of Regiomontanus (Italian), in G Hamann (ed.) Regiomontanus studies (Vienna, 1980), 217-222.


Additional material

  1. Viola on Amaldi
    • He transferred to Modena in 1906, where he was a professor in Analytical and Projective Geometry (until 1919), then in Padua he was a professor of Descriptive Geometry with Applications (1919-1922) and of Analytical Geometry (1922-1924).
    • In these one feels the ties of friendship and deep lifelong adoration, beginning in the years in which they were colleagues at the University of Padua, and that veneration by Amaldi always remained unconditional and enthusiastic, as attested by the splendid commemoration of him delivered in the Lincei Academy in 1946 and the noble words that he wrote in the preface of the second edition, revised and corrected, of the aforementioned Lezioni di meccanica razionale personally edited in 1951-52.
    • He was a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, a member of the Accademia dei Lincea, a member of the XL, a member of the academies of Modena, Padua, Turin and Catania, and a corresponding member of the Veneto Institute of Sciences, Literature and Arts.

  2. Gaschutz's My Path
    • I would also like to express my thanks for longer hospitalities at other institutions: at our mathematical Tusculum in the Black Forest, where I spent three-fourths of a year in total; to Michigan, Padua, Florence, London, Warwick, Chicago, and Canberra.
    • I am delighted to be able to thank Mr Zacher from Padua in person.

  3. Pompilj publications
    • Giuseppe Pompilj, I controlli di accettazione, Atti del convegno di studi per la statistica aziendale (CEDAM, Padua, 1954).
    • Giuseppe Pompilj, Sopra alcune applicazioni della statistica alla produzione industriale, Atti del convegno di studi per la statistica aziendale (CEDAM, Padua, 1954).

  4. Science at St Andrews
    • He had already written four short books of deep originality, the first in Aberdeen five years previously, then two at Padua where he drew his inspiration from the school of Galileo and Cavalieri and then a fourth at London during the summer when he was on his way home from Italy.
    • In the same year Gregory set out for Padua, and on his way through London persuaded Rieve, who was an expert craftsman, to try to fashion a mirror suitable to the design: but with the tools available nothing better was achieved than a crude polish with cloth and putty.

  5. The Tercentenary of the birth of James Gregory
    • Gregory spent the next three years in Italy, visiting Flanders and Rome in his tour and returning by Paris, but settling for most of the time at Padua, where Galileo had taught.
    • At Padua, Gregory wrote two imperishable little volumes, one called the Vera Quadratura - the true quadrature of the circle and hyperbola - and the other the Geometriae Pars Universalis, which enhanced his reputation as a brilliant thinker, and gained for him at once the disapproval of the great Flemish physicist, Huygens, and a Fellowship at the recently-founded Royal Society.

  6. Rudio's talk
    • Surely we can look for the origins of the bold ideas to which we owe our modern worldview in the stimulating scientific exchange that Copernicus experienced in Bologna and later on in Rome, Padua and Ferrara.

  7. Smith's History Papers
    • The various arithmetics of the earlier days make mention of it in connection with Padua, Venice, and other centres of trade, so that it is natural to expect that any textbook published there would be purely mercantile in character.

  8. Gibson History 8 - James Stirling
    • In 1717, on the invitation of Nicolas Tron, the Venetian Ambassador at the English Court to whom he had dedicated his Lineae Tertii Ordinis Neutonianae, he went to Italy in the belief that he would be appointed to a professorship of mathematics in one of the Universities of the Venetian Republic (Padua seems to have been the only "one").

  9. Collins writes about himself
    • In a letter to James Gregory, who was living in Padua at the time, John Collins introduces himself and writes a little about his situation.

  10. Cecioni publications
    • Francesco Cecioni, Lezioni sui fondamenti della matematica, premesse e questioni generali (CEDAM, Padua, 1958).

  11. Cariolaro's papers
    • Note that Cariolaro spent a year undertaking military service as a firefighter in Padua.

  12. Gibson History 5 - James Gregory
    • After a residence of about three years in Padua he returned, in 1668, to Scotland.


Quotations

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Famous Curves

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Chronology

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EMS Archive

  1. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Born 1873 at Padua, Veneto, Italy; Died 1941 .

  2. EMS 125th Anniversary booklet
    • Born 1873 at Padua, Veneto, Italy; Died 1941 .


BMC Archive

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Gazetteer of the British Isles

  1. References
    • The Story of Padua.
    • Padua - Touristic Itineraries.


Astronomy section

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JOC/BS August 2001